Best Saltwater Fish For Beginners
  Buy Recommended Beginner Saltwater Fish at www.aquariumcreationsonline.net
facebook button twitter button Blogspot button Youtube button Pinterest button Google Plus button Tumbler button

Login & View Cart
 
saltwater fish live corals marine plants Invertebrates aquarium supplies aquarium live rock live sand

Best Saltwater Fish For Beginners


When putting together a saltwater aquarium, you’ll have many options available to you. You’ll need to choose the correct tank and all the right components. These steps might take some learning, but choosing the right saltwater fish for a beginner marine aquarium is not difficult because we've done the work for you. Here are over 50 Popular Saltwater Fish Choices that are beginner friendly. They have been chosen by Aquarium Creations for their beauty, personality, hardiness, ability to get along with other tank-mates, and fishes overall ease of care.

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8
Longnose Hawkfish
Oxycirrhites typus
Picture of Longnose Hawkfish You Tube Video of the Longnose Hawkfish

Description: Known as the Longnose Hawkfish, Long-Nose Hawkfish or Longnose Hawk. They have a very distinct needle-like snout that looks narrow, but is actually quite voluminous. Because of this, theLongnose Hawkfish is quite capable of eating ornamental invertebrates. Quite easy to care for, the Longnose Hawkfish is also one of the least aggressive of the Hawkfish. The Longnose Hawkfish is a hardy, semi-aggressive fish. Although it eats small fish and shrimp, it makes an excellent reef inhabitant under the proper conditions. It likes to perch on and be camouflaged by the Red Gorgonian Sea Fan or other similar decor.

Tank Recommendations: A 30 gallon or larger aquarium is acceptable, and should have a tight-fitting lid to prevent escape. Although it eats small fish and shrimp, with caution, it can make an excellent reef inhabitant. The aquarium requires live rock on which the hawkfish can perch itself on, just like it would in the wild. Keeping more than one hawkfish (unless it is a compatible pair) will require a really big and cleverly decorated aquarium. The hawkfish is normally kept in an aquarium with fish from other families. As a general rule, it is best to add all the other fish to the aquarium and let them familiarize themselves with the environment before introducing your hawkfish.

Food and diet: Hawkfish are a predatory species that needs a carnivore diet in the aquarium. The best diet for Hawkfish will be composed of meats, frozen foods and live feeder shrimp. While it is possible, it is not common for Longnose Hawkfish to eat any form of prepared food. As with most marine fish, feed the hawkfish twice a day.

Level of Care: Easy

Acclimaton Time: 2+ hours

Reef Compatibility :with caution

Approximate Purchase Size: Small 1-1/4" to 2" Medium 2" to 2-1/2" Large 2-1/2" to 3"


Small $39.99 Medium $43.99 Large $49.99


Flame Hawkfish
Bodianus mesothorax
Picture of Flame Hawkfish
Click to view You Tube Video Flame Hawkfish


Description: The most popular of all Hawkfish. The Flame hawk is bright red with black mascara around the eye and a black line along the back. This species will pearch in a favorite spot, occasionally roaming up to a few spots in the tank. They adapt well to aquarium life and generally learn to accept food quickly. This species is one of the least aggressive Hawkfishes, but may be aggressive toward smaller, passive fishes. Provide with structures to perch on and nooks and crannies to hide in (in nature it lives within branching coral heads).

Tank Recommendations: A 30 gallon or larger aquarium is acceptable, and should have a tight-fitting lid to prevent escape. Although it eats small fish and shrimp, with caution, it can make an excellent reef inhabitant. The aquarium requires live rock on which the hawkfish can perch itself on, just like it would in the wild. Keeping more than one hawkfish (unless it is a compatible pair) will require a really big and cleverly decorated aquarium. The hawkfish is normally kept in an aquarium with fish from other families. As a general rule, it is best to add all the other fish to the aquarium and let them familiarize themselves with the environment before introducing your hawkfish.

Food and diet: Hawkfish are a predatory species that needs a carnivore diet in the aquarium. The best diet for Hawkfish will be composed of meats, frozen foods and live feeder shrimp. While it is possible, it is not common for Longnose Hawkfish to eat any form of prepared food. As with most marine fish, feed the hawkfish twice a day.

Level of Care: Easy

Acclimaton Time: 2+ hours

Reef Compatibility Yes with caution

Approximate Purchase Size: Small: 3/4" to 1-1/2"; Medium: 1-1/2" to 2-1/2"; Large: 2-1/2" to 3-1/2"



Small $59.99 Medium $64.99 Large $69.99


Melanurus Fairy Wrasse (Male)
Halichoeres melanurus (Melanisia
Picture of Melanurus Wrasse,Halichoeres melanurus YouTube Video the Beautiful Melanurus Wrasse


Description: The Melanurus Wrasse, is also called the The Hoeven's Wrasse, Tail Spot Wrasse, Yellow-lined Wrasse, Orange-tipped Rainbowfish, and Pinstriped Wrasse. One of the best kept secrets in the hobby, the Melanurus Wrasse is one of the best problem solvers for Planaria flatworms in reef aquariums. It also protects both corals and clams by eating fireworms. The Melanurus Wrasse will consume flatworms and you will see the difference within a matter of a couple of days. Once the flatworms are gone you have an attractive, friendly fish that will readily adjust to a captive diet and frequent the water column with activity. It can be housed with a wide-range of fish species and rarely bothers tank mates.

Tank Recommenations: A 55 gallon or larger aquarium with a shaded area is recommended. A 2 to 3 inch sand bed so they cab bury themselves in the sand to sleep or hide. Live Rock provides numerous small life forms that the Wrasses consider a tasty treat as well as another place to hide when they feel threatened.

Food and diet: Feed a varied diet that includes vitamin enriched finely chopped meaty foods such as shrimp, brine shrimp, squid, clams, chopped beef heart all vitamin enriched with Selcon or something similar. Feed at least twice a day.

Reef Compatability: Excellent

Level of Care: Easy

Approximate Purchase Size: Small 1-1/2" to 2",Medium 2" to 3",Large 3" to 4"








Small $39.99 Medium $49.99 Large $69.99


Carpenter's Fairy Wrasse
Paracheilinus carpenteri
Picture of Carpenter’s fairy wrasse, Paracheilinus carpenteri YouTube Video Carpenter's Fairy Wrasse

Description: These wonderful fish make a fascinating display in the peaceful community tank or reef tank! Also called the Redfin Flasher Wrasse or Pinkfin Flasher Wrasse, Males are most spectacular when they "flash" (display) toward other fishes or their reflections in the aquarium glass. An interesting side note is that all male Flasher Wrasse colors will intensify when in courtship is in process. Therefore by putting in a group of Carpenter Flashers with a male and females both present, that way the males will be more likely to frequently present their colorful displays. A perfect reef and home aquarium fish, the Carpenteri Flasher's adult size is around 3 inches.

Tank Recommendations: A 30 gallon or larger aquarium, either fish-only or reef, with a shaded area is recommended. A 2-3 inch sand bed so they can bury themselves in the sand to sleep or hide. Live Rock should be provided for all Fairy and Filament Wrasses. The Live Rock provides numerous small life forms that the Wrasses consider a tasty treat as well as another place to hide when they feel threatened. Note: Wrasses are known to jump from aquariums. Be sure to have some sort of covering with no large open holes that they can escape from.

Food and diet:Flasher wrasses have a high metabolism and should be fed several small meals a day rather than two large meals. Best practice is to use a refugium as part of the system’s filtration. This will provide a constant food supply of small live foods (e.g. copepods). A regular diet should include vitamin enriched frozen mysis shrimp, vitamin enriched frozen brine shrimp, and other meaty foods along with a high quality marine flake and marine pellet food.

Reef Compatability:Excellent

Level of Care: Easy


Approximate Purchase Size:

Small 1-1/2" to 2"; Medium 2"to 2-1/2"; Large 2-1/2" to 3"


Small $35.99 Medium $39.99 Large $49.99



Exquisite Fairy Wrasse
Cirrhilabrus exquisitus, Africa

Description: The Exquisite Wrasse, also called the Emerald Fairy Wrasse, is a gorgeous emerald green with deep maroon to red accents and smatterings of blues, oranges, yellows and purples adorning itself. The coloration is highly variable, and is dependent on numerous factors. The colors will actually change depending on the mood of the fish. Their exact age or maturity, along with their gender and phase dictates the intensity of their coloration and exact markings. Juvenile Exquisite Fairy Wrasse, regardless of their origin, have a white patch on their nose, where the leader of the pack called the Terminal Phase Male will always display the most vibrant coloration when compared to Initial Phase Males, females and juveniles in the group. Occuring over rubble or low patch reefs in areas of current, also on reef edges and around rubble zones. Like other fairy wrasses of the Cirrhilabrus genus, The Exquisite Wrasse once established will become more active and be one of the best eaters in your tank. Given proper care they will give years of enjoyment in either a Reef or Fowler Aquarium.

Tank Recommendations: The Exquisite Fairy Wrasse maximum adult size is around 5 inches. We recommend keeping in a tank of at least 70 gallons in size. A 2-3 inch sand bed so they can bury themselves in the sand to sleep or hide. Live Rock should be provided for all Fairy and Filament Wrasses. The Live Rock provides numerous small life forms that the Wrasses consider a tasty treat as well as another place to hide when they feel threatened. Note: Wrasses are known to jump from aquariums. Be sure to have some sort of covering with no large open holes that they can escape from.

Food and diet:Best to feed several smaller meals a day rather than one large meal. Best practice is to use a refugium as part of the system’s filtration. This will provide a constant food supply of small live foods (e.g. copepods). A regular diet should include vitamin enriched frozen mysis shrimp, vitamin enriched frozen brine shrimp, and other meaty foods along with a high quality marine flake and marine pellet food.

Reef Compatability: Excellent

Level of care: Easy

Approximate Purchase Size: 3" to 4"


$89.99

Red Head Solon Fairy Wrasse
Cirrhilabrus solorensis (Indian Ocean)
Picture of Red Head Solon Fairy Wrasse, Cirrhilabrus solorensis YouTube Video Red Head Solon Fairy Wrasse


Description: The Red Head Solon Fairy Wrasse originates from the west Pacific Ocean and the eastern Indian Ocean, and is primarily found in the waters surrounding Indonesia and Bali. Also called the Solar fairy Wrasse, Tricolor Fairy Wrasse, Clown Fairy Wrasse, Red Head Wrasse and Solorensis Fairy Wrasse, like most other fairy wrasses is a truly stunning fish. The Solorensis Fairy Wrasse adapts well to captivity and is easy to care for. It is very colorful, hardy, and friendly towards other fishes which make it an ideal saltwater and reef aquarium fish. It is somewhat suitable as a beginner fish even though there are other cheaper fish species such as many damsels that can be said to be better beginner fish for those who want to keep their first saltwater aquarium. Aquarists that have kept saltwater species for a while should not have any trouble caring for this fish.


Tank Recommendations: The maximum adult size is around 5 inches. We recommend keeping in a tank of at least 75 gallons in size. A 2-3 inch sand bed so they can bury themselves in the sand to sleep or hide. Live Rock should be provided for all Fairy and Filament Wrasses. The Live Rock provides numerous small life forms that the Wrasses consider a tasty treat as well as another place to hide when they feel threatened. Note: Wrasses are known to jump from aquariums. Be sure to have some sort of covering with no large open holes that they can escape from.

Food and diet:Best to feed several smaller meals a day rather than one large meal. Best practice is to use a refugium as part of the system’s filtration. This will provide a constant food supply of small live foods (e.g. copepods). A regular diet should include vitamin enriched frozen mysis shrimp, vitamin enriched frozen brine shrimp, and other meaty foods along with a high quality marine flake and marine pellet food.

Reef Compatability: Excellent

Level of Care: Easy

Approximate Purchase Size: 2-1/2 inches to 4 inches


$54.99



Aquarium Conditioned
Yellow Tang
Zebrasoma flavescens (Hawaii)
Picture of Yellow Tang,Zebrasoma flavescens (Hawaii)
YouTube Video of Yellow Tang Feeding On Nori Algae

Description: This is one of the most well known, popular fish in the marine hobby. A member of family Acanthuridae it has a beautiful oval shaped body possessing a single pastel-like yellow color along with long continuous dorsal, anal fins and crescent tailfins. It has sharp white razor spur near the tail, which it uses during fights and also to establish itself over other fishes. When sleeping or stressed a white line appears on the flanks of this fish. If you are going to keep more than one tang in the same tank it is best to introduce them simultaneously, or to introduce smaller individuals first. This is a good community or reef aquarium fish. Fairly resistant to diseases, the Yellow Tang is relatively easy to care for. It can be housed in groups of 3 or more as a shoal, or singly. It will also defend a preferred hiding place from intruders. Provide this active fish with plenty of swimming room, as well one or two hiding places.

Tank Recommendations: Will do best in a reef aquarium with plenty of live rock and hiding places. It should be housed in an aquarium of at least 100 gallons with ample room to swim. Like other Tangs, this member of the Acanthuridae family demonstrates territorial aggression towards its own species, or Tangs in general. Therefore, it is best to keep either one Yellow Hawaiian Tang per aquarium or 3 or more Yellow Hawaiian Tangs and introduce all into the system simultaneously.

Food and diet: Yellow Tangs are primarily herbivores. In the wild they feed mainly on leafy brown algae like Sargassum and Dictyota. Provide lots of algae, prepared frozen formulas containing algae or spirulina, and flakes. Japanese Nori or other seaweed can be adhered to the aquarium glass with a vegetable clip. It will also feed on some frozen brine and mysis shrimp. Some hobbyists also have great success with supplemental foods such as previously boiled or frozen zucchini, broccoli, spinach, and leaf lettuce. For the health of your fish it is always desirable to soak all fish food including algae with vitamins to help keep your fish healthier and less susceptible to disease. Another helpful tip is to soak your fishes food in garlic as well. Especially when adding new fish and whenever your notice ich or other disease in the aquarium. Garlic helps repel external parasites, such as ich, and boosts immunity in all your fish.

Level of Care: Easy

Acclimaton Time: 2+ hours

Reef Compatibility: Great hardy addition to any fish-only or reef aquarium system.

Approximate Purchase Size: Small 1-1/2" to 2" Medium 2" to 3-1/2" Large 3-1/2" to 4-1/2" XLarge 4-1/2" to 6"




Small $49.99 Medium $59.99
Large $89.99 XLarge $109.99





Captive-Bred
Blue Hippo Tangs Here Now!
Paracanthurus hepatus
Picture of Captive-Bred Blue Hippo Tangs
Click to view Captive-Bred Blue Hippo Tangs

Description: We are proud to offer Captive-Bred Blue Hippo Tangs. Guaranteed to be 100% Spawned and Raised in captivity and will immediately accept a variety of foods that are readily available for saltwater aquarium fish. They are fully acclimated to aquarium life and much more hardy than wild collected specimens. Of the thousands of fish available to the trade, this is one of the most popular of them all! Shy, especially when first introduced to the aquarium, the Blue Tang should be provided with coral, live rock, or other suitable shelter sites. The Blue Tang will lie on is side (often startling those unaware of it's behavior) if it cannot find a suitable hiding place, or when first introduced into the aquarium. Once settled into an aquarium, this is an active and remarkably peaceful fish and one which can be mixed with almost any other species, including other surgeonfish. In larger aquariums, its also possible to keep multiple Blue Hippo Tangs together, though there will often be some fighting between them as they work out a dominance hierarchy. If possible, purchase smaller specimens and add them together, as this will usually reduce problems with aggression. This species is usually more docile than many other Surgeonfishes, and gets along great in a peaceful community or reef tank.

Tank Recommendations: With a maximum size of around eight inches, this energetic species will need a suitably large fish tank when fully grown, with a recommended size being 180 gallon. For the smaller Captive Bred Blue Hippo Tangs we recommend at least a 40 gallon aquarium but suggest a minimum size of 55 gallons if multiple fish will be included. Remember they are very active during the day therefore they need a larger tank than one would think, with plenty of room to swim about but will also need rocks/ corals to provide some cover and to sleep in at night. As they are primarily herbivores they ignore invertebrates, but lush natural algae growth will be greatly appreciated. Once they get acclimated and become accustom to aquarium foods they are quite hardy and long lived

Food and diet: Many people purchase Blue Hippo Tangs based on an assumption that like the rest of it's Tang cousins, it will consume problem algae in the aquarium. Sometimes as an adult it will consume algae as a supplement to it's regular diet, but it's staple diet consists of plankton and meaty foods. Feed frozen mysis shrimp, finely chopped raw shrimp, flake, pellet and frozen preparations. They will also enjoy eating frozen preparations for herbivores. For the health of your fish it is always desirable to soak all fish food including algae with vitamins to help keep your fish healthier and less susceptible to disease. Another helpful tip is to soak your fishes food in garlic as well. Especially when adding new fish and whenever your notice ich or other disease in the aquarium. Garlic helps repel external parasites, such as ich, and boosts immunity in all your fish.

Level of Care: Easy (Captive Raised)

Acclimaton Time: 2+ hours

Reef Compatibility: Great reef fish. Typically fares notably better in reef aquariums than in fish only tanks.

Approximate Purchase Size: Small: 1-1/4" to 2" Medium: 2" to 2-1/2"

Small $89.99
Medium $134.99

Aquarium Conditioned
Purple Tang
Zebrasoma xanthurus (Red Sea)
Picture of Purple Tang,Zebrasoma xanthurus (Red Sea) Click to view video of Purple Tang

Description: One of the most desired saltwater fish for the home aquarium, the Purple Tang was brought into the aquarist trade back in the 1960's, and originally collected only in the Red Sea, they have now been found in other locations such as the Gulf of Eden and in the Arabian Sea. Other names this beauty is known by is the Yellowtail Sailfin Tang, Yellowtail Surgeonfish, and Blue Surgeonfish. Adults in the wild will grow to about 10 inches, smaller of course in an aquarium.

Tank Recommendations: Will do best in a reef aquarium with plenty of live rock and hiding places. Provide Purple tangs with plenty of open swimming room. In the wild they swim all over the reef grazing on algae. The Purple Tang is a great choice for aquariums of 120 gallons or more. In larger aquariums of 300 gallons or more, you can keep them in a small school provided they are added at the same time. Like other Tangs, Purple Tangs demonstrate territorial aggression towards their own species, or Tangs in general. When introducing a variety or a group of surgeon tangs to an aquarium, it is best to add them in groups to help avoid territorial disputes. Purple Tangs tend to be extra aggressive towards conspecifics with the same body shape such as the Yellow Tang and Scopas Tang. Again, this is where adding them together really makes a big difference.

Food and diet: The Purple Tang will graze over the live rock in the aquarium eating algae. Try using a rubber-band to attach the algae to a small rock or pvc pipe and place it in the sand bed. Provide lots of algae, prepared frozen formulas containing algae or spirulina, and flakes. Japanese Nori or other seaweed can be adhered to the aquarium glass with a vegetable clip. It will also feed on some frozen brine and mysis shrimp. Some hobbyists also have great success with supplemental foods such as previously boiled or frozen zucchini, broccoli, spinach, and leaf lettuce. For the health of your fish it is always desirable to soak all fish food including algae with vitamins to help keep your fish healthier and less susceptible to disease. Another helpful tip is to soak your fishes food in garlic as well. Especially when adding new fish and whenever your notice ich or other disease in the aquarium. Garlic helps repel external parasites, such as ich, and boosts immunity in all your fish.

Level of Care: Easy

Acclimaton Time: 2+ hours

Reef Compatibility: Great hardy addition to any fish-only or reef aquarium system.

Approximate Purchase Size: Small 1-1/2" to 2" Medium 2" to 3-1/2" Medium/Large 3-1/2" to 4-1/2" Large 4-1/2" to 6"





Small $169.99 Medium $189.99
Medium/Large $229.99 Large $299.99





Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8

Copyright 2018 Aquarium Creations Online
Photos are representative of each species. All marine life will be unique and variations should be expected, color and sizes may vary.
*Guarantee Restriction: All of our livestock are guaranteed. However for one or more of these species, they may be marked with a guarantee restriction. If it does, it means the specific animal may not handle stress from environmental conditions well. These stresses can include poor water quality, harassment from tank mates or confined aquarium conditions. When stressed, these species can lose the ability to ward off infection and disease. Other species may be listed as Restricted because they have such specialized feeding requirements that is difficult recreate in a aquarium and may succumb to malnutrition.