Dwarf Angelfish|Dwarf Angels|Saltwater Aquarium Dwarf Angelfish
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Angelfish-Dwarf

In the wild, the Saltwater Dwarf Angelfish diet consists mainly of algae and tunicates. Angels require plenty of live rock for picking off of and they should be given a balanced diet. Therefore introduce your Saltwater Angel fish into a well-established aquarium with an ample supply of algae and other live rock growth will present the best opportunity for their long life. The majority of Dwarf Angel fish adapt well to life in a display tank. Variety is important. Feed marine angels foods from a wide range of food groups. Feeding a single type of food for too long is generally a bad idea. By providing this type of habitat it stimulates Angels feeding instincts, which in turn helps them adjust to accepting tank fed aquarium foods such as Spirulina, nori and other dried or frozen preparations for herbivores, vitamin-enriched and color enhanced marine flakes, live brine or mysid shrimps, finely chopped dried or frozen crustacean or other high-quality meaty fares suitable for carnivores. Dwarf Angelfish also need to be fed algae and nori sheets as well as a good pellet food. Foods that are not already vitamin-enriched can be soaked in a liquid vitamin supplement such as Selcon. This helps prevent Dwarf Angel fish disorders such as head and lateral line erosion (HLLE).


    Dwarf Angels Are Generally Compatible With:
  • Large Angelfish
  • Anglers & Frogfish
  • Anthias
  • Basslets
  • Batfish
  • Blennies
  • Boxfish
  • Butterflyfish
  • Cardinalfish
  • Clownfish
  • Damselfish
    Dwarf Angels Are Generally Compatible With
  • Filefish
  • Goatfish
  • Gobies
  • Grunts & Sweetlips
  • Hawkfish
  • Hogfish
  • Parrotfish
  • Pseudochromis
  • Puffers
  • Squirrelfish
  • Tangs & Surgeons
    Dwarf Angelfish ARE NOT Compatible With:
  • Eels
  • Groupers
  • Lionfish
  • Pipefish
  • Rays
  • Sharks
  • Seahorses
  • Scorpionfish
  • Triggerfish
  • Large Wrasses
Special Note: When you see "Aquarium Conditioned" it means the saltwater fish we ship are guaranteed to have gone through our Conditioning Process which is from 15 days to 30 days long, depending on species. The process includes enough time to let us have confidence sending marine life out knowing they will not be stressed in proper aquarium conditions and they will eat marine food well. During this time the arriving marine species first go through a Quarantine, then go into our aquarium life systems. In our life systems they are placed to put their...fins up for a few weeks while they de-stress getting accustomed to aquarium life. At first we feed a large amount of live food, slowly weaning by mixing healthy species specific frozen foods. Some species are easier to change over than others, but no saltwater fish is ever released unless they are eating well and have a good stomach.

18 Results
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Aquarium Conditioned
Lamarck's Angelfish
Genicanthus lamarck
Picture of Lamarck Angel
Identification: More easily kept than some other angelfish, what makes this fish attractive to me is the way their body picks up the actinic lighting and gives it a silver/blue appearance. It is very popular with aquarist's of all levels. Unlike many other angelfish species, the Lamarck's angelfish is known to leave other angels alone in the aquarium. Fish of the genus Genicanthus are the only zooplanktivores among the angelfish. They do not eat Sponges, Clams, Corals or any other sessile Invertebrate. Therefore they will not harm any invertebrates or corals and they are totally reef safe. It readily adapts to life in captivity, accepting aquarium food easily and acclimates to the conditions found in a well-maintained aquarium.

TankRecommendations: Provide a 100 gallon or larger tank with large amounts of live rock for hiding and grazing on micro fauna.

Food and diet: It is important to give it a varied diet in the aquarium but you don’t have to feed it zooplankton; various types of meaty food is known to work well. You can for instance make your own formula by mixing seafoods like shrimps, squid, mussels, clams etcetera with each other and adding some vegetables, e.g. spinach or green peas. Adding algae to the diet is recommended, e.g. fresh and marine algae + spirulina. Lamarck's angelfish will also like angelfish preparations and live food such as brine shrimp and mysid shrimp.

Level of Care: Moderate

Acclimaton Time: 3+ hours

Reef Compatibility : Reef Safe

Approximate Purchase Size: Small: 1" to 2"; Medium: 2" to 3"; Large: 3" to 4-1/2"

Female Small$39.99 Male Small$69.99
Female Medium $49.99 Male Medium $99.99
Female Large $59.99 Male Large $149.99

Aquarium Conditioned
African Flameback Angelfish
Centropyge acanthops
Picture of Flameback Angel
Identification: This feisty little jewel is one of the smallest of the Centropyge family and is known for spawning in the home aquarium. All of the dwarf or pygmy Angelfish in the Centropyge genus are among the hardiest in the entire Angelfish family. The Flameback Angel is also known as the African Pygmy Angelfish, or Orangeback Angel. It features an orange and yellow dorsal fin, an orange eye, and a deep blue body with a yellowish/orange tail fin. As one of the smallest members of the Centropyge family, the Flameback Angel is not necessarily reef safe as it picks on coral mucous and small sessile inverts. It is semi-aggressive and will defend its territory, but usually will not bother other tank mates.

TankRecommendations: Provide a 50 gallon or larger tank with large amounts of live rock for hiding and grazing on micro fauna.

Food and diet: African Flameback Angelfish require a varied diet that contains both plant and animal matter. They do best with smaller food items like brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, dwarf angelfish frozen foods, staple flake foods (Formula I & II) and other similar foods designed for marine omnivores. They will also appreciate the grazing opportunities that mature live rock provides in terms of algae, sponge and small organisms that are found growing on the surface of established live rock.

Level of Care: Moderate

Acclimaton Time: 3+ hours

Reef Compatibility :Not Reef Safe

Approximate Purchase Size: Small: 1/2" to 1"; Medium: 1" to 2"; Large: 2" to 3"

Small $59.99
Medium $64.99
Large Out of Stock

Aquarium Conditioned
Swallowtail Angelfish
Genicanthus melanospilos
Picture of Swallowtail Angelfish

Identification: Also called Blackspot or Spotbreast Angelfish. The female is yellow dorsally and light blue ventrally. The caudal fin is marine-blue highlighted by a dark, blue-black edging on the top and bottom. The male is marked with a series of vertical red stripes covering the entire pale colored body. The tail of the male is forked and is yellow with blue edges. One of the more brightly colored of its Genus, the Swallowtail Angelfish is an excellent species to have in the home aquarium. Like its cousins, the Swallowtail Angelfish feeds on Zooplankton, not Sponges, Corals or any other sessile Invertebrate. This makes it an excellent candidate for a Reef type aquarium or a community aquarium with other Angelfish.

TankRecommendations: Provide a 125 gallon or larger tank with large amounts of live rock for hiding and grazing on micro fauna.

Food and diet: It is important to give it a varied diet in the aquarium but you don’t have to feed it zooplankton; various types of meaty food is known to work well. You can for instance make your own formula by mixing seafoods like shrimps, squid, mussels, clams etcetera with each other and adding some vegetables, e.g. spinach or green peas. Adding algae to the diet is recommended, e.g. fresh and marine algae + spirulina. Swallowtail angelfish will also like angelfish preparations and live food such as brine shrimp and mysid shrimp.

Level of Care: Moderate

Acclimaton Time: 3+ hours

Reef Compatibility : Reef Safe

Approximate Purchase Size: Small: 1-1/2" to 2"; Medium: 2" to 3"; Large: 3" to 4.5"

Female Small$59.99 Male Small$139.99
Female Medium $69.99 Male Medium $149.99
Female Large $99.99 Male Large $169.99

Aquarium Conditioned
Female Bellus Angelfish
Genicanthus bellus
Picture of Female Bellus Angelfish

Identification: The Female Genicanthus bellus is one of the prettiest species of swallowtail angelfish, and their small adult size makes them the most suited to aquarium life. Like all Genicanthus, G. bellus has very strong sexual color differences and some would argue that the female Bellus angelfish is even prettier than the male. The Bellus Angelfish (also called the Bellus Lyretail Angelfish, and Ornate Angelfish is one of the best reef safe angelfish. For those unfamiliar with this fish, the Bellus Angelfish is a relatively small (to seven inches), hardy and attractive angelfish with a generally peaceful disposition. Unlike most angelfish, they tend to leave invertebrates and corals alone, making them one of the few angelfish appropriate for a reef tank.

TankRecommendations: Provide a 120 gallon or larger tank with large amounts of live rock for hiding and grazing on micro fauna.

Food and diet: It is important to give it a varied diet in the aquarium but you don’t have to feed it zooplankton; various types of meaty food is known to work well. You can for instance make your own formula by mixing seafoods like shrimps, squid, mussels, clams etcetera with each other and adding some vegetables, e.g. spinach or green peas. Adding algae to the diet is recommended, e.g. fresh and marine algae + spirulina. Bellus angelfish will also like angelfish preparations and live food such as brine shrimp and mysid shrimp.

Level of Care: Moderate

Acclimaton Time: 3+ hours

Reef Compatibility : Reef Safe

Approximate Purchase Size: Females: Small: 1" to 1-1/2"; Medium: 1-1/2" to 2-1/4"; Large: 2-1/4" to 3-1/2"

Female Small$159.99
Female Medium $179.99
Female Large $199.99

Aquarium Conditioned
Male Bellus Angelfish
Genicanthus bellus
Picture of Male Bellus Angelfish

Identification: The Bellus Angelfish from the genus Genicanthus is unusual in that they are not classed as true dwarf angels, yet they remain relatively small size. They also display a remarkable sexual dimorphism. Bellus Angelfish are ideal for a deepwater reef aquarium with lots of shady overhangs and crevices amongst the live rock. The Bellus Angelfish is a very active species that does require a good amount of space. Keep either singly, as a male-female pair, or one male with a harem of several females, but never house more than 1 male or with any other members of the Genicanthus genus. Several fishkeepers have spawned this species in the home aquarium, but there are no reports of the successful raising of fry.

TankRecommendations: Provide a 120 gallon or larger tank with large amounts of live rock for hiding and grazing on micro fauna.

Food and diet: It is important to give it a varied diet in the aquarium but you don’t have to feed it zooplankton; various types of meaty food is known to work well. You can for instance make your own formula by mixing seafoods like shrimps, squid, mussels, clams etcetera with each other and adding some vegetables, e.g. spinach or green peas. Adding algae to the diet is recommended, e.g. fresh and marine algae + spirulina. Bellus angelfish will also like angelfish preparations and live food such as brine shrimp and mysid shrimp.

Level of Care: Moderate

Acclimaton Time: 3+ hours

Reef Compatibility : Reef Safe

Approximate Purchase Size: Males: Small: 3" to 3-1/2", Medium: 3-1/2" to 3-3/4, Large: 3-3/4" to 5"

Male Small$159.99
Male Medium $179.99
Male Large $199.99

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Copyright 2018 Aquarium Creations Online
Photos are representative of each species. All marine life will be unique and variations should be expected, color and sizes may vary.
*Guarantee Restriction: All of our livestock are guaranteed. However for one or more of these species, they may be marked with a guarantee restriction. If it does, it means the specific animal may not handle stress from environmental conditions well. These stresses can include poor water quality, harassment from tank mates or confined aquarium conditions. When stressed, these species can lose the ability to ward off infection and disease. Other species may be listed as Restricted because they have such specialized feeding requirements that is difficult recreate in a aquarium and may succumb to malnutrition.