Saltwater Aquarium Eels
 

 
Saltwater Fish

Aquarium Saltwater Fish Aquarium Live Corals Aquarium Marine Plants Invertebrates Aquarium Live Rock Aquarium Live Sand
 
 

 Saltwater Aquarium Moray Eels

If you are planning on keeping a saltwater eel it will be from the Moray family of Eels. They have minimal maintenance needs but that fierce reputation is well earned. Beyond the fact that they are totally intimidating there are more than 100 eels in the family Muraenidae that are able to be kept in the home aquarium environment. One keeping moray eels must be very careful because all species have those needle-like teeth which can cause severe damage and some victims have lost fingers, thumbs and sometimes more as a result. Though we all get tempted at times, avoid hand feeding any of the moray family. They can move exceedingly quick and with their poor eyesight often bites will occur because they can't readily distinguish between food and your fingers. So we always advise using a feeding stick, or tongs when feeding and finally you must always keep yourself alert to what's going on.

Marine Eels have a very good sense of smell but have very poor eye site. Always check on the maximum size of your intended Eel so you can plan your aquarium size. Saltwater Marine eels live in holes or caves in the ocean therefore all saltwater aquarium eels require adequate hiding places which can either be had from using live rock to make tunnels or you can place PVC pipes in the aquarium. We would also include a well-sealed lid to make sure your saltwater eels stay where they belong, in the water. When marine eels open there mouth it is no threat to their owner, they actually breath by opening their jaws to let water flow through their gills. Saltwater eels have a reputation as vicious hunters, but are usually harmless if handled correctly. They are compatible with Triggerfish, Pufferfish, and Larger Angelfish. If well fed we even have had small Damsels be safe in the same tank.

Feeding - We recommend feeding twice a week. Also if your Moray Eel doesn't eat do not despair.. It's not unusual for new marine eels to go on a hunger strike for several weeks after introduction to new quarters, so it may be necessary to train the moray onto captive diets. Regular careful feedings using the protection of feeding tongs will produce a trust between your moray and you. It's rare for them to starve to death, so keep plugging away until they feed!

Water quality - Even the smallest species is a relatively large fish compared to most other species commonly kept and, as such, their feed input and waste output is pretty prodigious. Filtration must cope with the large quantities of solid waste these fishes generate, so mechanical media needs to be suitably efficient and cleaned regularly.Consider the quantities of ammonia that can be generated - and that includes potentially dangerous 'spikes' after meals. Extremely efficient biological filtration is also a must, with an adequately sized external canister or trickle filtration being ideal, and ensure a high turnover for adequate oxygenation. Don't even consider a moray without a preferably oversized protein skimmer. Monitor alkalinity and pH, as it's easy for values to fall outside optimal with the high biomass.

What to feed - Morays diet varies. They're all carnivorous, but some require a crustacean-based diet while others will favour fish or squid. The greatest clue to any species diet is dentition. Crustacean feeders tend to have flattened teeth for grinding and crunching hard-shelled invertebrates, while the needle-like teeth of piscivorous species are used for spearing and gripping slippery prey. Whatever the diet of your chosen species, variety is important. Specialist crustacean feeders should have a range of prawns and crabs. Piscivores will benefit from a mix of frozen fish species as well as squid. Vitamin supplementation should be considered for all morays to prevent dietary deficiencies.

Tank mates - Tank mates should vary, depending on species and diet and smaller, crustacean feeders can co-habit with a range of fish species and sessile invertebrates, although they may eat very small fish. Larger, more predatory morays need to be kept in either a species aquarium or with robust, aggressive or semi-aggressive species. Porcupine fish, puffers, lionfish and triggers can be good choices of companion - providing they're not meal-sized. Can morays be maintained in a reef system? It's possible for the smaller species, notably the Snowflake and Chain link but filtration still needs to be able to cope with relatively high waste outputs. For larger morays, maintaining water quality suitable for invertebrates becomes much more of a challenge. Realistically, you'll want to consider these specimens for a fish-only system and species or mixed large 'predator' set-ups will be the best route. Final Caution - Saltwater Moray Eels can be a challenge to keep due to their ability to escape aquariums. Keep a tight fitting lid or light diffuser panel on the tank. When feeding Eels, remember that an Eels eyesight is very poor. They may accidentally bite your hand. We recommend the use of feeding tongs instead of using fingers. A bite from any Eel can cause a serious bacterial infection. It is important to clean the wound area well and immediately seek medical help.

Chainlink Moray Eel
Echidna catenata

Click to view You Tube Video on the Chainlink Moray Eel
Description: One of the most popular morays in the aquarium trade. It readily accepts most foods, stays relatively small and is less of a threat to its fish tank mates than many other morays. It may pester some fish when food is added to the water. Like most morays, this eel will spend much of its time with its head protruding from under a rock or from a crevice during the day. However, in time it will become more brazen and move about in the open more when the aquarium is illuminated. Provide with plenty of hiding places. Chain link moray eels have long slender bodies. They have white coloring with a slightly yellow tint. They get their name for round, black or gray chain markings across their entire bodies.
Recommended Tank: 20 gallon or larger
Food and diet: Carnivorous, feeds on crustaceans – live food may be required to initiate feeding, very easy to maintain once established.
Reef Compatability: With caution, will not hurt corals but will eat small crustacion's, but no harm to even small fish.
Level of Care: Easy
Approximate Purchase Size: Small: 6" to 8"; Medium: 9" to 12"; Large: 12" to 18"

Small $49.99 Medium $59.99 Large $99.99
Quantity :
:

Zebra Moray Eel (Fiji)
Gymnomuraena zebra

Click to view You Tube Video of a beautiful Zebra Moray Eel in Maui, Hawaii!
Description: The Zebra Moray is one of the most docile eels available, making it ideal foe a peaceful community tank. These eels rarely bother even the smallest fish. They feed on crustaceans, not fish. They are quite shy initially; a situation not uncommon to many eels. Like most morays, this eel will spend much of its time with its head protruding from under a rock or from a crevice during the day. However, in time it will become more brazen and move about in the open more when the aquarium is illuminated. Provide with plenty of hiding places.
Recommended Tank: The Zebra Mooray Eel requires a 125 gallon or larger aquarium with numerous rock crevices for hiding and a secure, tight-fitting lid to discourage its escape.
Food and diet: Carnivorous, feeds on crustaceans – live food may be required to initiate feeding, very easy to maintain once established.
Reef Compatability: With caution, will not hurt corals but will eat small crustacion's, but no harm to even small fish.
Level of Care: Easy
Approximate Purchase Size: Large: 15" to 20"; Xlarge 20" to 30"

Large $259.99 XLarge $299.99
Quantity :
:

  Snowflake Eels
Echidna nebulosa

Click to view You Tube Video on the Snowflake Moray Eel
Description :The Snowflake Eel is one of the most popular ocean eels in the aquarium trade. It readily accepts most foods, stays relatively small and is very low threat to fish in its tank than any other moray. It may pester some fish when food is added to the water. Like most morays, this eel will spend much of its time with its head protruding from under a rock or from a crevice during the day. However, in time it will become more brazen and move about in the open more. If you wish an eel in a reef tank the Snowflake eel is the #1 choice. They won't bother sessile invertebrates, will not harm corals, no harm to even small fish. Some creative aquascaping will be required though to provide them with a dimly lit home if keeping them with light-loving corals. Make sure caves are created to support their need for dimmer light levels.
Recommended Tank: 20 gallon or larger
Food and diet: Carnivorous, feeds on crustaceans – live food may be required to initiate feeding, very easy to maintain once established.
Reef Compatability: They won't bother sessile invertebrates, will not harm corals, no harm to even small fish. Some creative aquascaping will be required to provide them with a dimly lit home if keeping them with light-loving corals. Make sure caves are created to support their need for dimmer light levels.
Level of Care: Easy
Approximate Purchase Size: Small: 6" to 8"; Medium: 9" to 12"; Large: 12" to 18"


Small $29.99 Medium $39.99 Large $79.99
Quantity :
:

 



Black Edge Moray Eel
Gymnothorax saxicola

Click to view You Tube Video on the Black Edge Moray Eel
Description:The Black Edge Moray Eel is a delightful, hardy species, endemic to the originates from the seagrass beds of the Caribbean Ocean. Also called the Ocellated Moray, the Black Edge Moray has golden spots covering their tan to brown body and they have a golden underside. Their tail and dorsal side are trimmed with black which is the source of their common name. The adult Black Edge Moray will reach approximately 24 inches in length. Caution needs to be noted since the Black Edge Moray is a more aggressive species than is commonly seen within the aquarium hobby. The Black Edge Moray Eel is known to attempt to eat any fish or invertebrate that will fit into its mouth, this along with its size make it necessary to have a large aquarium and other large tank mates.
Recommended Tank: The Black Edge Moray Eel should be supplied with an aquarium of at least 125 gallons, a sand substrate, and plenty of live rock, to provide at least one (preferably two) cavernous refuge where it can hide its entire body (make sure the live rock is secure as they are a powerful species and can dislodge rockwork). They should also be equipped with efficient biological and mechanical filtration and would greatly benefit from the addition of a quality protein skimmer to assist with organic waste. Since eels are known for their excellent escape and jumping skills they should only be housed in an aquarium with a tight-fitting, sealed hood; they are also a nocturnal species and should only be exposed to subdued lighting conditions during their first few days of acclimation to a new environment.
Food and Diet: The Black Edge Moray Eel is a much more aggressive feeder than most species of eel commonly seen within the aquarium trade. Its diet consists of live feeder fish, squid, and octopus, and it will eat other fish in the aquarium if they small enough to fit into its mouth. Black Edge Moray Eels should only be kept with very large fish species as any smaller fish or invertebrates will be eaten. There should be no problems getting this species to begin feeding as it will readily take to live feeders or meaty foods offered to it via a feeding stick or tongs.
Reef Compatability: Will eat crustaceans and topple corals that are not firmly placed.
Level of Care: Easy
Approximate Purchase Size: Medium (12" to 16"), Large (16" to 24")

Medium $89.99 Large $129.99
Quantity :
:

Japanese Dragon Eel
Enchelycore pardalis

Click to view You Tube Video on the Japanese Dragon Moray Eel
Description :The Holy Grail of the moray eels, the spectacular Japanese Dragon Eel. Many aquarists covet the Dragon moray or Japanese Dragon Eel, Enchelycore pardalis and it's easy to see why. With its psychedelic mottled coloration of orange, black and white and its prominent nasal 'horns', this is a real stunner. Hailing from the Indo-Pacific, it is a carnivorous animal that eats primarily fish, reaching around 24" to 34" in length.
Recommended Tank: Japanese Dragon Eels should be supplied with an aquarium of at least 150 gallons, a sand substrate, and plenty of live rock, which provides at least one (preferably two) caves where it can hide its entire body (make sure the live rock is secure as they are a powerful species and can dislodge rockwork). They should also be equipped with efficient biological and mechanical filtration and would greatly benefit from the addition of a quality protein skimmer to assist with organic waste. Eels are known for their excellent escape and jumping skills and should only be housed in an aquarium with a tight-fitting, sealed hood; they are also a nocturnal species and should only be exposed to subdued lighting conditions during their first few days of acclimation to a new environment. Japanese Dragon Eels are highly aggressive and have evolved to specifically prey upon fish (including other eels) that will fit into their mouths; however, they are known to be facultative piscivores and they will also consume benthic crustaceans aside from "cleaner" shrimp of the Hippolysmata, Lysmata, and Periclimenes genera. They are ideally suited for large FOWLR systems with large, aggressive tank mates that will not fit into their mouths.
Food and diet: Carnivorous, may require live food to initiate feeding. May accept pieces of fresh shrimp impaled on a feeding stick. Known to engage in some long periods of fasting, for months at a time, without harm.
Reef Compatability: Not recommended
Approximate Purchase Size: Medium: (8" to 14"), Large: (14" to 20"), XLarge (20" - 24"), XXLarge (24" to 32");
Level of Care: Difficult

Medium (8" - 14") $1199.99 Large (14" - 20") $1199.99
XLarge (20" - 24") $1299.99 XXLarge (25" - 32") $1399.99

Quantity :
:

Tessalata Eel
Gymnothorax favagineus (Indian Ocean)

Click to view You Tube Video on the Tessalata Moray Eel
Description: The Tesselata Eel, Gymnothorax favagineus, also known as the Lace Moray Eel and Honeycomb Moray Eel is one of the most visually striking eels in the home aquarium trade.As an juvenile, the spots form a lattice pattern. In adults, the spots become smaller, so more of the white background is showing. Although lovely, it gets large (so house it accordingly) and it is very predatory, feeding on any fish it can swallow. Do not underestimate its ability to ingest fish tankmates, some of which may look to large for it to swallow! It is also a eel predator and will make short work of morays that are smaller than it is. It will jump out of open aquariums and may even knock off glass tops at night when it moves about the aquarium. Tessalata Moray Eels are ideally suited for larger FOWLR systems with aggressive tank mates that will not fit into their mouths. Recommended Tank: Tessalata's require an aquarium of at least 150 gallons, a sand substrate, and plenty of live rock, which provides at least one (preferably two) caves where it can hide its entire body (make sure the live rock is secure as they are a powerful species and can dislodge rockwork). They should also be equipped with efficient biological and mechanical filtration and would greatly benefit from the addition of a quality protein skimmer to assist with organic waste. Eels are known for their excellent escape and jumping skills and should only be housed in an aquarium with a tight-fitting, sealed hood; they are also a nocturnal species and should only be exposed to subdued lighting conditions during their first few days of acclimation to a new environment.
Food and diet: Carnivorous, may require live food to initiate feeding. May accept pieces of fresh shrimp impaled on a feeding stick. Known to engage in some long periods of fasting, for months at a time, without harm.
Reef Compatability: Not Suggested
Level of Care: The Tesselata Eel should only be cared for by an experienced aquarists as they can grow up to 50 inches and need a large, non-reef tank.
Approximate Purchase Size: Medium: 8" to 10"; Large: 10" to 15"; XLarge: 15" to 20"

Medium (8" - 10") $199.99 Large (10" - 15") $229.99 XLarge (15" - 24") $329.99

Quantity :
:

Wolf Eel
Congrogadus subducens

Click to view You Tube Video on the Green Wolf Eel
Description: This fish from the Indo-West Pacific is neither an eel nor a blenny (and most certainly not a wolf). Other common names include the carpet eel blenny or just plain ol' eel blenny. As described in detail in Fish Tales 2004-4, this fish is a member of the Pseudochromidae (Dottyback) family. The male wolf eel is green, while the female is a more drab gray/brown with a pinkish hue that seems to vary in intensity.
Recommended Tank: A 50 gallon or larger aquarium with plenty of hiding places throughout the aquarium.
Food and diet: Its diet should include meaty foods such as small marine fish, chopped clam, and prawns in its diet.
Reef Compatability: with caution
Level of Care: Easy
Approximate Purchase Size: Small: 6" to 7"; Medium: 7" to 8"; Large: 8" to 10";; XLarge: 10" to 14"

Small(6" - 7") $49.99 Medium (7" - 8") $54.99 Large (8" - 10") $59.99XLarge (10" - 14") $69.99

Quantity :
:

Hass's Spotted Garden Eel
Taenioconger hassi

Click to view Video on Hass's Spotted Garden Eel
Description: The Spotted Garden Eel, also known as Hass's Garden Eel. A portion of the Garden eel is usually buried in the sand, If he is approached and feels in danger the spotted Garden Eel will retreat into the substrate. Several of these eels may be kept together in a 50 gallon or larger aquarium with at least 6 inches of sand, a gentle current, and without aggressive tank mates. Decor should be kept at a minimum. A tight-fitting lid is required to prevent escape.
Recommended Tank: A 50-gallon or larger aquarium with a sand bed at least 6 inches deep. If multiple specimens are desired we recommend one start with a 75 gallon or larger tank. Most of the eels that are lost in an aquarium are due to poorly sealed tanks. All eels are escape artists, be cautious.
Food and diet: arden Eel diet consists of meaty foods and live foods such as freshwater ghost shrimp or small feeder fish.
Reef Compatability: Excellent
Level of Care: Moderate
Approximate Purchase Size: 8" to 12"

$59.99

Quantity :
:


Golden Moray Eel
Gymnothorax miliaris

Description:The Golden Moray Eel is simply stunning. Coming from only a few of the reef areas off the coast of South Africa. Since they are a Dwarf eel, they can be placed in smaller tanks that larger Moray eels require. In the wild they will only reach about a length of 2 feet. And in an aquarium they stay smaller than that. Best kept in a tank with a secure lid and plenty of hiding spots. The Golden Moray is considered a peaceful tankmate. While it does not commonly eat other fish or crustaceans there is always the possibility that it may eat fish that are small enough to fit in its mouth, as well as a variety of crustaceans. Color on these beauties can vary to any shade of yellow with black spots of varying size.
Recommended Tank: A 55 gallon or larger aquarium
Food and diet:Carnivorous, feed a variety of foods including live fish and meaty foods. Once aquarium acclimated you will find the Golden Moray will do fine on just meaty foods such as squid.
Reef Compatability: with caution
Level of Care: Easy
Approximate Purchase Size:Small: 4" to 6"; Medium: 6" to 12"; Large: 12" to 18"

Small Sold Out Medium Sold Out Large Sold Out
Quantity :
:

 
Black Ribbon Eel
Rhinomuraena quaesita
Fromia Star
Description: The Ribbon Eel family is quite a colorful lot. The juveniles start out black, then change color in adulthood. The males turn blue and yellow, eventually becoming females and turning yellow or yellow-green later in life. They are relatively peaceful, though they are predators. It is often seen sitting with its mouth open to breathe, frequently mistaken for a predatorial stance. This species can live very long, and they do great in large aquariums with a good amount of rock to hide in. Studies have shown that this species does better in aquariums when in pairs.
Recommended Tank: Black Ribbon Eels should be supplied with an aquarium of at least 75 gallons, a sand substrate, and plenty of live rock, which provides at least one (preferably two) cavernous refuge where it can hide its entire body (make sure the live rock is secure as they are a powerful species and can dislodge rockwork). They should also be equipped with efficient biological and mechanical filtration and would greatly benefit from the addition of a quality protein skimmer to assist with organic waste. Eels are known for their excellent escape and jumping skills and should only be housed in an aquarium with a tight-fitting, sealed hood; they are also a nocturnal species and should only be exposed to subdued lighting conditions during their first few days of acclimation to a new environment.
Food and diet: In the aquarium it will most likely need to receive live foods such as ghost shrimp, but in time it will learn to feed frozen or freeze-dried krill, strips of fresh or frozen fish, fresh or frozen uncooked shrimp, and most meaty foods. It can be taught to hand feed, although this should be done with caution, as it can inflict a painful bite.
Reef Compatability: Will eat crustaceans and small fishes. May topple corals that are not firmly placed. Predatorial fish may nip at it.
Level of Care: Difficult, no guarantee beyond live arrival due to difficult nature.
Acclimation Time: 3+ hours
Approximate Purchase Size: 18" to 24"

$99.99
Quantity :


Blue Ribbon Eel
Rhinomuraena quaesita
Fromia Star
Description:The Blue Ribbon Eel, also known as the Yellow Ribbon Eel, is a stunningly vibrant specimen in the Moray Eel family from the Indo-Pacific region. The Ribbon Eel family is quite a colorful lot. The juveniles start out black, then change color in adulthood. The males turn blue and yellow, eventually becoming females and turning yellow or yellow-green later in life. They are somewhat aggressive, being a predatorial fish. It is often seen sitting with its mouth open to breathe, frequently mistaken for a predatorial stance. This species can live very long, and they do great in large aquariums with a good amount of rock to hide in. Studies have shown that this species does better in aquariums when in pairs.
Recommended Tank: Blue Ribbon Eels should be supplied with an aquarium of at least 75 gallons, a sand substrate, and plenty of live rock, which provides at least one (preferably two) cavernous refuge where it can hide its entire body (make sure the live rock is secure as they are a powerful species and can dislodge rockwork). They should also be equipped with efficient biological and mechanical filtration and would greatly benefit from the addition of a quality protein skimmer to assist with organic waste. Eels are known for their excellent escape and jumping skills and should only be housed in an aquarium with a tight-fitting, sealed hood; they are also a nocturnal species and should only be exposed to subdued lighting conditions during their first few days of acclimation to a new environment.
Food and diet:In the aquarium it will most likely need to receive live foods such as ghost shrimp, but in time it will learn to feed frozen or freeze-dried krill, strips of fresh or frozen fish, fresh or frozen uncooked shrimp, and most meaty foods. It can be taught to hand feed, although this should be done with caution, as it can inflict a painful bite.
Reef Compatability: Will eat crustaceans and small fishes. May topple corals that are not firmly placed. Predatorial fish may nip at it.
Level of Care: Difficult, no guarantee beyond live arrival due to difficult nature.
Acclimation Time: 3+ hours
Approximate Purchase Size: 18" to 24"

$99.99
Quantity :

White Ribbon "Ghost" Eel
Pseudechidna brummeri
Fromia Star
Description:The White Ribbon Eel, also known as the Ghost Eel, is from the Indo-Pacific region. Though it is related to the Blue Ribbon Eel, the White Ribbon Eel is the only member of the Pseudechidna genus in all the Moray Eel family. The body is mostly white with salt and pepper spots around the head and long nostrils extending from the nose. The coloring of this species can change with age, taking on a brown tone. They are somewhat aggressive, being a predatorial fish. This species can live very long, and they do great in large aquariums with a good amount of rock to hide in. Studies have shown that this species does better in aquariums when in pairs.
Recommended Tank: White Ribbon Eels should be supplied with an aquarium of at least 55 gallons, a sand substrate, and plenty of live rock, which provides at least one (preferably two) cavernous refuge where it can hide its entire body (make sure the live rock is secure as they are a powerful species and can dislodge rockwork). They should also be equipped with efficient biological and mechanical filtration and would greatly benefit from the addition of a quality protein skimmer to assist with organic waste. Eels are known for their excellent escape and jumping skills and should only be housed in an aquarium with a tight-fitting, sealed hood; they are also a nocturnal species and should only be exposed to subdued lighting conditions during their first few days of acclimation to a new environment.
Food and diet: In the aquarium it will most likely need to receive live foods such as ghost shrimp, but in time it will learn to feed frozen or freeze-dried krill, strips of fresh or frozen fish, fresh or frozen uncooked shrimp, and most meaty foods. It can be taught to hand feed, although this should be done with caution, as it can inflict a painful bite.
Reef Compatability: Will eat crustaceans and small fishes. May topple corals that are not firmly placed. Predatorial fish may nip at it.
Level of Care: Difficult, no guarantee beyond live arrival due to difficult nature.
Acclimation Time: 3+ hours
Approximate Purchase Size: 18" to 24"
$99.99
Quantity :