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Saltwater Aquarium Sharks

Sharks can be a fun addition to an aquarium that is large enough to suit the particular species, and provides the right environment. When it comes to housing a shark, bigger IS better. For an adult shark we recommend a minimum of a 180 gallon aquarium and a 300 gallon would be even better. Juvenile sharks can be kept in smaller aquariums but be prepared to up-size to a larger aquarium as your shark grows in size. In the aquarium sharks MUST have room to move around, so keep your aquarium display to a minimum. When designing your aquarium make sure you have some sort of cave to be used for hiding. Even if its one of the more sedetary species of sharks they all roam the reef at night looking for food. They use their very sensitive sense of smell and their electroreceptors to find food. The sharks recommended for the saltwater aquarium get no larger than 30 to 36 inches as an adult. Recommended sharks in alphabetic order: the Banded Bamboo Shark (Chiloscyllium punctatum), the Eaulette Shark (Hemiscyllium ocellatum),the Horned Shark (Heterodontus francisci), and the Marbled Cat Shark (Atelomycterus Macleayi).

Black Banded Cat Shark
Chiloscyllium punctatum
Picture of Cat Shark,Chiloscyllium punctatum
Description: They prefer reefs and tide pools and are frequently found sitting in sandy areas on the ocean floor. The Black Banded Cat Shark is called a Cat Shark because of the barbels at the mouth look just like a cat's whiskers. The other name common is the Brown Banded Cat Shark. Care should be taken when cleaning the display tank and feeding. Like all sharks, this one has the possibility of inflicting a very painful bite, especially when provoked. Sharks tend to act aggressively toward other fish, particularly smaller ones. Be sure to house with larger, aggressive species.
Tank Recommendations The Banded Cat Shark requires at least a 180 gallon or larger aquarium as an adult. It requires a soft sand bottom as the substrate as the belly can easily be scratched by coarser substrate, which may lead to an infection. Like all sharks, it can never be exposed to copper-based medications. Like most sharks the Banded Cat Shark is a nocturnal species that inhabits waters where less light is present, therefore they are light sensitive. Typically it stays hidden in an aquarium while the bright lights on, and therefore should be provided with an adequately sized cave or light-sheltered space where it can hide. A better remedy is to have more subdued lighting for sharks and you will find they will be out and about more.
Food and Diet: Feeding can be more difficult in the beginning. When first introduced try tiny pieces of squid and live saltwater feeder shrimp. Once feeding feed a more varied diet consisting of chunks of meaty foods including krill, raw table shrimp, squid, clam and mussel.
Reef Compatability: No
Level of Care: Difficult
Acclimation time: 3+ hours
Approximate Purchase Size: Small up to 5", Medium 5" to 7", Large 7" to 10", XLarge 10" to 15"

Small $99.99 Medium $129.99
Large $199.99 XLarge $399.99



Captive Bred Banded Cat Shark
Chiloscyllium punctatum
Picture of Captive Bred Banded Cat Shark,Chiloscyllium punctatum
Our Captive Bred Banded Cat Shark Program
Description: Our Captive Bred Banded Cat Sharks have been lovingly hatched and raised in our tanks from their egg. We hand feed them small pieces of fresh squid, shrimp, and other crustaceans every other day. Because of this, they are more accustomed to human contact than wild-caught Banded Cat Sharks, and they are comfortable with tank life. You can feed yours by hand, as well. Just be sure to cut up the pieces small enough as pieces that are too big may get spat back out. Many of our hand fed Banded Cat Sharks are so comfortable with people that you can pet them. But never forget that they are sharks, and you should still be cautious and alert when handling and caring for them.
Tank Recommendations The Banded Cat Shark requires at least a 180 gallon or larger aquarium as an adult. It requires a soft sand bottom as the substrate as the belly can easily be scratched by coarser substrate, which may lead to an infection. Like all sharks, it can never be exposed to copper-based medications. Like most sharks the Banded Cat Shark is a nocturnal species that inhabits waters where less light is present, therefore they are light sensitive. Typically it stays hidden in an aquarium while the bright lights on, and therefore should be provided with an adequately sized cave or light-sheltered space where it can hide. A better remedy is to have more subdued lighting for sharks and you will find they will be out and about more.
Food and Diet: When first introduced tiny pieces of squid work best. Once feeding feed a more varied diet consisting of chunks of meaty foods including krill, raw table shrimp, squid, clam and mussel.
Reef Compatability: No
Level of Care: Moderate
Acclimation time: 3+ hours
Approximate Purchase Size: Small up to 5", Medium 5" to 7"

Small $199.99 Medium $249.99



Banded Cat Shark Egg
Chiloscyllium punctatum
Picture of Cat Shark Egg,Chiloscyllium punctatum
Description: Place your egg somewhere with good water flow, and, in 2 - 8 weeks, you'll see it hatch into a 4 - 5 inch Banded Cat Shark. While you cannot predict the precise moment of hatching, you can tell that hatching time is near by the size of the yolk sack remaining in the egg. This yolk sack is the nourishment for the embryo, and the shark will emerge once the yolk sack is used up. If your egg hatches prematurely, it is recommended that you quarantine the baby inside a large plastic container with lots of holes for water flow, until the yolk sack is used up and falls off. The quarantine will help reduce the risk of the sack breaking. *Do not expose shark egg to air as there is a risk of air bubbles getting trapped inside and harming the shark.
Newborn Bamboo Cat Shark Info: Place the newborn in a large container such as a plastic deli container that has been perforated with a large number of holes for water flow. The smoothe container is a safe haven for the first few weeks of life. It may take from a few days to a few weeks to start eating. Offer your baby banded shark tiny pieces of squid or shrimp to encourage to start eating.
Important Tips: Please remember the tips we are providing are important factoids in getting Newborn sharks to feed. Baby sharks will try to split up their food pieces or will resist eating all together, so your assistance is essential to its survival. Please do not attempt to hatch the egg yourself unless the yoke has been completely consumed. The shark will do it on its own when it's ready. If the yoke is completely consumed carefully open the egg with a very sharp razor blade carefully to not harm the contents
Food and Diet: Feeding can be more difficult in the beginning. When first introduced try tiny pieces of squid and live saltwater feeder shrimp. Once feeding feed a more varied diet consisting of chunks of meaty foods including krill, raw table shrimp, squid, clam and mussel.
Tank Recommendations: Make sure your aquarium has a soft sand bottom without any sharp rocks it may get scratched on. Provide medium water flow as they prefer it.
Level of Care: Difficult
Acclimation time: 3+ hours *Do not expose egg to air as there is a risk of air bubbles getting trapped inside.
Approximate Purchase Size: 2-3/4" to 5"

$49.99

Australian Marbled Cat Shark
Atelomycterus Macleayi
Picture of Australian Marbled Cat Shark
Feeding Our Marble Sharks and Banded's
Description: The Australian Marbled Catshark (Atelomycterus macleayi) grows to a max of 24 inches. It's sometimes confused or misidentifed with other species including the Coral Catshark (Atelomycterus marmoratus), and the White-spotted Bamboo (Chiloscyllium. plagiosum). Both are larger species. The Australian marbled catshark, Atelomycterus macleayi, is found in the eastern Indian ocean and Australia coast from the surface to 800 feet. Not recommended to mix with fish that will nip at the fins of sharks. The Australian Marbled Catshark is friendly to others generally all the time. When feeding it may compete for food aggressively however. It is always good to have a secured rock structure so the shark can hide. Iodine supplements are recommended, as well as shark vitamins for health.
Tank Recommendations The Australian Marbled Cat Shark requires at least a 240 gallon or larger aquarium as an adult. It requires a soft sand bottom as the substrate as the belly can easily be scratched by coarser substrate, which may lead to an infection. Like all sharks, it can never be exposed to copper-based medications. Like most sharks the Marbled Cat Shark is a nocturnal species that inhabits waters where less light is present, therefore they are light sensitive. Typically it stays hidden in an aquarium while the bright lights on, and therefore should be provided with an adequately sized cave or light-sheltered space where it can hide. A better remedy is to have more subdued lighting for sharks and you will find they will be out and about more.
Food and Diet: When first introduced tiny pieces of squid work best. Once feeding feed a more varied diet consisting of chunks of meaty foods including krill, raw table shrimp, squid, clam and mussel.
Reef Compatability: No
Level of Care: Difficult
Acclimation time: 3+ hours
Approximate Purchase Size: Small up to 8", Medium 8" to 10", Large 10" to 12"

Small $149.99 Medium $189.99 Large $299.99



Captive Bred Epaulette Sharks
Hemiscyllium ocellatum
Picture of Captive Bred Epaulette Sharks
Video of Saltwater Aquarium with Epaulette Shark
Description: Our Captive Bred Epaulette Sharks have been lovingly hatched and raised from their egg. We hand feed them small pieces of fresh squid, shrimp, and other crustaceans every other day. Because of this, they are more accustomed to human contact than wild-caught Banded Cat Sharks, and they are comfortable with tank life. You can feed yours by hand, as well. Just be sure to cut up the pieces small enough as pieces that are too big may get spat back out. Many of our hand fed Banded Cat Sharks are so comfortable with people that you can pet them. But never forget that they are sharks, and you should still be cautious and alert when handling and caring for them. The Epaulette Shark, Hemiscyllium ocellatum, is a beautiful spotted pattern and a characteristic pair of large spots above their pectoral fins. This conspicuous marking resembles the shoulder décor used on military uniforms to signify rank, lending the "epaulette" term to their common name. The Captive-Bred Epaulette Shark does grow quickly but will only reach about 30" in the home aquarium, making them an excellent choice for advanced aquarists looking to keep a real nice shark. Native to the shallow reefs of Northern Australia and New Guinea, this shark species has evolved extraordinary adaptations to survive the harsh, fluctuating environment of tide pools and coral flats. As the tide goes out and isolated pools of water form, the Epaulette shark exploits their confines as easy hunting grounds. In a motion similar to land based amphibians, Epaulettes can use their paired pectoral and pelvic fins as arms and legs to maneuver around coral and rock formations. They can also tolerate high temperatures and very low oxygen levels as exposed tide pools become increasingly more inhospitable.
Tank Recommendations We consider the Epaulette Shark to be for the very experienced aquarist They must be provided with a low stress environment with limited disruption, an easy to consume diet with multivitamin supplementation and excellent water quality. Despite their relative small size and relaxed disposition, a full sized Epaulette will need to be housed in a tank with a minimum size of 200 gallons and carefully chosen tank mates. It requires a soft sand bottom as the substrate as the belly can easily be scratched by coarser substrate, which may lead to an infection. Like all sharks, it can never be exposed to copper-based medications.
Food and Diet: When first introduced tiny pieces of squid work best. Once feeding feed a more varied diet consisting of vitamin enriched chunks of meaty foods including krill, raw table shrimp, squid, clam and mussel.
Reef Compatability: No
Level of Care: Difficult
Acclimation time: 3+ hours
Approximate Purchase Size: Small 5" to 7",Medium 7" to 9" "

Small Female $699.99 Small Male $769.99
Medium Female $799.99 Medium Male $869.99



Horn Shark
Heterodontus francisci
Picture of Horn Shark, Heterodontus francisci
Video of Male & Female Horn Sharks Aquarium Feeding
Description: The Horn shark is not a typical shark. Instead of swimming in pursuit of prey, this slow moving shark flows along the ocean floor in search of shrimp, clams, oysters, etc. It's teeth are not big or sharp enough to keep away enemies, so the Horn Shark has its trademark spine at the front of the dorsal fin that it uses for defense to protect itself from being swallowed by larger fish. Horn Sharks are generally tan in color with some blotchy darker tan or brown areas and they may have a series of small black spots marking the body. The Horn Shark does grow quickly but will only reach about 36" in the home aquarium, making them an excellent choice for advanced aquarists looking to keep a real nice shark.
Tank Recommendations Shark requires at least a 240 gallon or larger aquarium as an adult. It requires a soft sand bottom as the substrate as the belly can easily be scratched by coarser substrate, which may lead to an infection. Like all sharks, it can never be exposed to copper-based medications. Like most sharks the Horn Shark is a nocturnal species that inhabits waters where less light is present, therefore they are light sensitive. Typically it stays hidden while the bright lights are on, and therefore should be provided with an adequately sized cave or light-sheltered space where it can hide. A better remedy is to have more subdued lighting for sharks and you will find they will be out and about more.
Food and Diet: When first introduced into the aquarium, small pieces of cleaned squid or live saltwater feeder shrimp should be used to entice this fish to eat. This is the best way to encourage the Horn Shark to begin eating as the squid has a strong odor, which helps entice the Horn Sharks appetite. Then it may be fed shrimp, scallops or pieces of fresh marine fish.
Reef Compatability: No
Level of Care: Difficult
Acclimation time: 3+ hours
Approximate Purchase Size: 10" to 14" "

$499.99



Spotted Wobbegong Shark
Orectolobus maculatus
Picture of Wobbygong Shark, Orectolobus maculatus
Youtube video Wobbygong Shark, Orectolobus maculatus
Description: There’s one other shark that seems to interest some aquarists who can afford a very large aquarium, and that's the Spotted wobbegong , Orectolobus maculatus. These odd-looking sharks have a flattened body, a very broad head with long barbells, and flaps of skin around the mouth. Wobbegong sharks grow relatively slowly if not overfed, wobbegong will outgrow your tank in time, and then what will you do with them? Although a larger tank is a possibility, you should consider the costs involved before you even purchase one. Wobbegongs are known to ambush, stalk and possibly lure their prey. They rely on a quick strike to catch their quarry unaware, and are adorned with spots, bands or reticulations that help them to “disappear” among coral, coralline algae and larger macroalgae. The flaps of skin around the mouth help to break up the body outline of the wobbegong’s head, enhancing this resemblance to reef substrate even further. The dermal flaps, and even the skin, of the wobbegong bears a resemblance to certain calcareous algae and encrusting invertebrates. Numerous bonyfishes and some crustaceans that feed on these marine plants and animals may mistake the inactive wobbegong for food-ridden substrate!

Wobbegongs are ideal aquarium sharks — if you have a large enough tank — because of their inactive lifestyles. However, their lethargy is also considered a negative attribute by some aquarists. Yes, there are people out there who think wobbegongs are boring! If you need a fish in your aquarium with a vast behavioral repertoire, then a wobbegong is not for you. When the lights are on, most wobbies simply lie under a ledge or in a cave until food comes within striking range. With the aid of a red incandescent light you can watch your wobbegong at night, when they are typically more active.

Tank Recommendations The Wobbygong requires a minimum of 300 gallons or larger. They readily adjust to aquarium confines. A bottom dwelling species, they can do well under the care of the experienced shark keeper. It requires a soft sand bottom as the substrate as the belly can easily be scratched by coarser substrate, which may lead to an infection. Like all sharks, it can never be exposed to copper-based medications. Like most sharks the Marbled Cat Shark is a nocturnal species that inhabits waters where less light is present, therefore they are light sensitive. Typically it stays hidden in an aquarium while the bright lights on, and therefore should be provided with an adequately sized cave or light-sheltered space where it can hide. A better remedy is to have more subdued lighting for sharks and you will find they will be out and about more.
Food and Diet: The wobbegongs have low metabolic demands, and therefore can be maintained in good condition on two feedings a week. Monitor your shark’s condition by visually examining the dorsal musculature. If it appears to be atrophying, feed your shark more frequently. A wobbegong may not eat when initially introduced into your aquarium. It is not uncommon for this preliminary fast to last as long as 10 to 14 days. When trying to elicit a feeding response in a fasting “wobbie” you should impale a fresh fish on a feeding stick (I use a sharpened piece of rigid airline tubing), presenting it to the shark head first. Lightly contact the barbels with the food item. If your wobbegong is hungry it will suddenly shoot forward and ingest the food. Because of their fast feeding behavior, hand-feeding a wobbegong is a foolhardy activity! Offer meaty foods including pieces of fresh shrimp, scallop, mysis shrimp, or marine fish flesh. Like most sharks, it may fast for weeks before it begins feeding. When first introduced into the aquarium, small pieces of cleaned squid or live saltwater feeder shrimp should be used to entice this fish to eat. Then it may be fed shrimp, scallops or pieces of fresh marine fish.
Reef Compatability: No
Level of Care: Difficult
Acclimation time: 3+ hours
Approximate Purchase Size: 8" to 12"

$999.99



Copyright 2018 Aquarium Creations Online
Photos are representative of each species. All marine life will be unique and variations should be expected, color and sizes may vary. *Guarantee Restriction: All of our livestock are guaranteed. However for one or more of these species, they may be marked with a guarantee restriction. If it does, it means the specific animal may not handle stress from environmental conditions well. These stresses can include poor water quality, harassment from tank mates or confined aquarium conditions. When stressed, these species can lose the ability to ward off infection and disease. Other species may be listed as Restricted because they have such specialized feeding requirements that is difficult recreate in a aquarium and may succumb to malnutrition.