Seahorses for Sale|Home Aquarium Seahorses|Captive Bred Seahorses
  Buy Sharks Online at www.aquariumcreationsonline.net
facebook button twitter button Blogspot button Youtube button Pinterest button Google Plus button Tumbler button

Login & View Cart
 
saltwater fish live corals marine plants Invertebrates aquarium supplies aquarium live rock live sand

Seahorses

Seahorses are a fish belonging to the family Syngnathidae, which also includes pipefish and leafy sea dragons. There are over 32 species of seahorse, mainly found in shallow tropical and temperate waters throughout the world. Seahorses are so named for their equine appearance. Although they are fish, they do not have scales, rather a thin skin stretched over a series of bony plates arranged in rings throughout their body. Each species has a distinct number of rings. Seahorses swim upright, another characteristic that is not shared by their fish relatives who swim horizontally. Seahorses have a coronet on their head, which is distinct to each seahorse, much like a human fingerprint. They swim very poorly by using a dorsal fin, which they rapidly flutter to propel them, and pectoral fins, located behind their eyes, which they use to steer. Because they are poor swimmers, they are most likely to be found resting in sea grasses or coral reefs with their prehensile tails wound around a stationary object. They have long snouts, which they use to suck up food, and eyes that can move independently of each other much like chameleon. Seahorses eat small shrimp, tiny fish and plankton...

Captive breeding of seahorses has become increasingly widespread. These seahorses survive better in captivity, and they are less likely to carry diseases. These seahorses will eat prepackaged, frozen mysis shrimp that are readily available from aquarium stores, and they do not experience the shock and stress of being taken out of the wild and placed in a small aquarium. Although captive-bred seahorses are more expensive, they survive better than wild seahorses, and take no toll on wild populations. There are many seahorse misconceptions. Seahorses should be kept in an aquarium to themselves, or with compatible tank-mates. Seahorses are slow feeders, and in an aquarium with fast, aggressive feeders, the seahorses will be edged out in the competition for food. Special care should be given to ensure that all individuals obtain enough food at feeding times. Seahorses can co-exist with many species of shrimp and other bottom-feeding creatures. Fish from the goby family also make good tank-mates. Some species are especially dangerous to the slow-moving seahorses and should be avoided completely: eels, tangs, triggerfish, squid, octopus, and sea anemones.

Seahorses should only be added to a mature, cycled saltwater aquarium. A seahorse tank must have gentle to moderate currents for them to be able to feed properly. There must be adequate biological filtration you should do water changes of 5-20 percent per week. Water should follow these guidelines before you introduce a seahorse:

pH - 8.0 to 8.3
Specific gravity - 1.021 to 1.024
Ammonia - 0
Nitrite - 0
Nitrate - <20 ppm

Most seahorse aquarists use taller tanks. Seahorses need height (2.5 to 3 times the UNCURLED length of the animals) in their tanks to court and mate. At a minimum, the depth of the tank, excluding the substrate, should be at least 2x the uncurled length of the animal. Further, leave a path along the substrate as some seahorses courting rituals require them to scoot along the bottom of the tank in tandem. Several pairs of pygmy seahorses can be maintained in a 5-10 gallon tank a 10G is recommended because of the difficulties of keeping water parameters stable in a small capacity aquarium. Two to three pairs of medium sized seahorses can be maintained in a 24-gallon tank although a larger tank is preferable to keep water parameters more stable.


How to Keep Seahorses Looking Their Best and Brightest

The flamboyant reddish, bright yellow, and blazing orange color morphs of the Brazilian Hippocampus reidi seahorse are almost legendary among aquarists. Seahorses employ a remarkable ability to change coloration. Since they rely on color for many things, including camouflage, complex social interactions, courtship rituals, and to express their mood and emotional state.Seahorses accomplishes their dramatic color changes through the contraction or expansion of pigment cells. Each pigment cell is a contractile cell or vesicle containing liquid pigment or pigment granules and capable of changing its form or size, thus causing changes of color in the skin of the animals that possess them. The pigment cells may be under nervous control and able to change very rapidly or under hormonal control and able to change only relatively slowly. The Hippocampus reidi is typically endowed with just a few different types of pigment color cells, and all colors are derived from these 3 or 4 basic pigments. The exact color the seahorse displays at any given time therefore depends on the concentration of these pigment cells, how close the cells are to the surface of the skin, and which color cells are expanded or contracted at the moment.

Amazing as it sounds, the Hippocampus Reidi seahorse has no orange pigment cells. The incredible bright orange coloration is produced by simultaneously expanding their yellow pigment cells and red pigment cells to the fullest. The exact shade of orange the reidi seahorse becomes and its brightness is determined by the proportion of yellow to red cells it opens, how fully they are expanded, and how close to the skin's surface they are. Obviously, a hippocampus reidi seahorse that is black has all its color cells expanded and a hippcampus reidi seahorse that is white has all of its color cells contracted so that all the wavelengths of visible light are reflected back to the observer.

What affects Seahorse Coloration?
The hobbyist should be aware that there are a number of environmental conditions and hormonal influences that can affect the coloration of seahorses in the aquarium, often by affecting the ability of color cells to contract and expand. These include the following factors:

Stress -- seahorses often respond to stress by darkening.
Emotional state -- when excited, seahorses typically brighten in coloration, reflecting a state of high arousal. On the other hand, fear, anxiety and distress are generally accompanied by dark, somber hues.
Social Interactions -- seahorses often brighten during their courtship displays; pair-bonded seahorses likewise brighten during their morning greeting rituals, and rivals go through characteristic color changes during their confrontations and competitions.
Competition for mates -- dominant individuals brighten; subordinate seahorses darken in submission.
Poor water quality -- high levels of wastes, ammonia, nitrite or nitrate can cause color cells to contract and colors to fade.
Low oxygen levels or high CO2 levels-- can cause colorful seahorses to fade.
Background colors -- seahorses will often change color in order to blend in with their immediate surroundings.
Medications -- some antibiotics and malachite-green-based remedies negatively affect color.
Tankmates -- seahorses may change their base coloration to blend in with the rest of the herd or to match their mate (or a potential partner). This can work both ways: a dark seahorse may brighten up and assume vivid hues when introduced to an aquarium with bright yellow or orange tankmates; In the same manner, a brightly colored seahorse may darken and adopt subdued coloration when placed amidst drab tankmates.

So What can you do to influence your Seahorse's coloration?
To Sum it all up, aside from providing your seahorses with optimal water quality, a stress-free environment, and an ideal, enriched staple diet, you must also take care to provide them with a colorful natural aquarium setting that will make them feel right at home. This means furnishing their aquarium with appropriate, multi-colored décor. Pay special attention to the hitching posts you select. Strive for bright reds, oranges, and yellows in anything your seahorses may adopt. Once the seahorse adopts a favorite base of operations like this, they will often proceed to change coloration to match their preferred resting spot. Reef tanks featuring colorful sponges, colorful mushrooms, leathers, and other seahorse-safe soft corals and gorgonians are ideal, guaranteed to keep seahorses feeling right at home and looking their best. Various types of Caulerpa, Gracilaria, and other attractive macroalgae can then be added to give your tank a welcome touch of green, red, gold and add a bit of living color (Giwojna, 2002). If your tank is not a reef tank, you can often achieve the same effect using "make beleive" coral, plastic gorgonians and replicas of marine plants to encourage them to retain their natural coloration. Many hobbyists find that a dark color substrate, such as black sand, brings out their seahorses' brightest colors and sets off their colorful hues exceptionally well.


Special note: Seahorses require very special care and have tank requirements that must be met for survival in an aquarium. Therefore we guarantee live arrival in good condition, but there is no guarantee beyond that due to their special needs.



Erectus Seahorse, Captive-Bred
Hippocampus Erectus
Picture of Captive-Bred Erectus Seahorse Captive-Bred Hippocampus Erectus Seahorse
Description: The Captive-Bred Lined Seahorse is one of the hardiest seahorse species making it a great choice for the dedicated enthusiast. The Erectus seahorse (Hippocampus erectus) is also called the lined seahorse. H. erectus will grow to approximately 7.5 inches and lifespan is around 5 years. The H.erectus species can be found with a myriad of colors, from greys and blacks to tan to yellow. The Erectus seahorse lives in the Atlantic Ocean as far north as Canada and as far south as the Caribbean, Mexico, and Venezuela. It swims in an erect position and uses its dorsal and pectoral fins for guidance while swimming. Tank Bred seahorses are quite hardy, and a smart alternative to wild caught seahorses. We highly recommended to NOT combine tank bred seahorses with wild caught sea horses due to the passing of serious disease issues.

Lined seahorses feed mainly on minute crustaceans and brine shrimp, which they suck in through their snout. They are able to suck their prey by creating a current of water leading directly into its snout. Since seahorses are weak swimmers, they must ambush their prey by blending into their surroundings, which they do rather easily. The lined seahorse's eyes can move independently of one another, allowing it to effectively scan its surroundings. The species is sexually dimorphic and it is easy to distinguish between a male and female lined seahorse. The males are larger and also have longer tails. The erectus seahorse is monogamous and performs ritual dances every morning to re-establish the bond with its mate. In addition, they create clicking sounds while embracing their partner. This action occurs when they initially find their mate. The intensity of their bond is also conveyed in how they handle the death of their partner: If either the male or female should die, the mate does not automatically replace the deceased mate with a new one. Often, it fails to find a new mate in its short lifespan.

Like with other seahorses, the male lined seahorse is the caregiver. During intercourse, the female sprays her eggs into the male's brood pouch where the eggs will incubate for 20–21 days. When the juveniles are ready to hatch, the male attaches its tail to a stationary structure and begins to arch its back, back and forth, releasing the juveniles into the water column. The juveniles are approximately 11 mm at birth. They quickly begin to learn and mimic the behavior of its parent. Courtship between the male and female parents begin immediately after birth. Note: Due to availability and individuality of each species, colors and sizes may vary.


Tank Conditions The Kuda Seahorse should ideally be kept in temperatures between 72 and 78 degrees Fahrenheit. A pH value of 8.1 or 8.4, and a specific gravity of 1.020 to 1.025 should be maintained. When kept with invertebrates, the specific gravity range should be 1.020 to 1.025, for the invertebrate species. In a fish only aquarium, the specific gravity should fall between 1.020 and 1.023

Tank Recommendations These social swimmers thrive when kept either as a mated pair or as a group in a species only aquarium. For a pair a 30 gallon aquarium will do, for every two additional seahorses add 10 gallons to the minimum size. Seahorses may be kept with small, slow feeding fish such as smaller gobies, pipefish, dragonets, and firefish. Stay away from aggressive, territorial, and fast moving fish as they will not be good neighbors for the seahorse. Seahorses need objects in the tank that they can attach themselves to with their prehensile tails, artificial plants, smooth rocks and artificial branching coral are ideal; avoid live corals and sharp rocks as these can injure the seahorses. In order to maintain coloration, we suggest keeping them in bright lighting with brightly colored objects that they may use as hitches.

Food and Diet: Our captive bred seahorses will thrive on frozen mysis shrimp. They need to be fed at least 2 to 3 times a day. Their diet may be supplemented by amphipods and copepods found in the live rock. Adding a refugium to the aquarium will increase this food source greatly. You may also feed vitamin-enriched adult brine shrimp, but this should be just as additional food. Brine shrimp have limited nutritional value.

Looking for the best food to feed your Seahorses?
We recommend AlgaGen Reefpods Tisbe

Reef Compatability: Yes

Level of Care: Moderate

Acclimation time: 2+ hours

Approximate Purchase Size: 1-1/2" to 2-1/2"

Male or Female $69.99



Kuda Seahorse, Captive-Bred
Hippocqmpus Kuda
Picture of Kuda Seahorse, Captive-Bred
Description: The Kuda Seahorse is a moderately sized seahorse species. Like all seahorses, the head is held at right angles to the body, the eyes can move independently of each other, and the tail is prehensile. The Kuda Seahorse is a smooth seahorse, with low spines. They often have spots, a dark band or bar on the body with colors showing from black to pale yellows. Colors are not fixed and may change based on surroundings, diet, stress, mood or possibly other factors. Also called the Estuary Seahorse, Smooth Seahorse and Spotted Seahorse. This incredible animal is tank bred and raised, and will reach a maximum size of approximately 6.9 inches tall when full grown. Seahorses are slow moving and peaceful animals that should only be kept with others of their own kind or with other peaceful animals. Tank Bred seahorses are quite hardy, and a smart alternative to wild caught seahorses. We highly recommended to NOT combine tank bred seahorses with wild caught sea horses due to the passing of serious disease issues.

Instead of having scales, as in most other fish, Kuda Seahorse have a layer of skin stretched over bony plates that are visible as rings passing around the trunk. Swimming is powered by the rapidly oscillating dorsal fin, and they steer using the fins on either side of the body. The Kuda Seahorse has a deep head and body and a thick, robust snout. Individuals are often completely black or they may be yellowish or cream with large dark spots. In common with other seahorses, this species is a master of camouflage, and may occasionally be sandy in colour in order to blend in with the background. The Kuda Seahorse is a high maintenance fish. They may act peacefully toward other fish.

Like with other seahorses, the male kuda seahorse is the caregiver. During intercourse, the female sprays her eggs into the male's brood pouch where the eggs will incubate for 20–21 days. When the juveniles are ready to hatch, the male attaches its tail to a stationary structure and begins to arch its back, back and forth, releasing the juveniles into the water column. The juveniles are approximately 11 mm at birth. They quickly begin to learn and mimic the behavior of its parent. Courtship between the male and female parents begin immediately after birth. Note: Due to availability and individuality of each species, colors and sizes may vary.


Tank Conditions The Kuda Seahorse should ideally be kept in temperatures between 72 and 78 degrees Fahrenheit. A pH value of 8.1 or 8.4, and a specific gravity of 1.020 to 1.025 should be maintained. When kept with invertebrates, the specific gravity range should be 1.020 to 1.025, for the invertebrate species. In a fish only aquarium, the specific gravity should fall between 1.020 and 1.023

Tank Recommendations These social swimmers thrive when kept either as a mated pair or as a group in a species only aquarium. For a pair a 30 gallon aquarium will do, for every two additional seahorses add 10 gallons to the minimum size. Seahorses may be kept with small, slow feeding fish such as smaller gobies, pipefish, dragonets, and firefish. Stay away from aggressive, territorial, and fast moving fish as they will not be good neighbors for the seahorse. Seahorses need objects in the tank that they can attach themselves to with their prehensile tails, artificial plants, smooth rocks and artificial branching coral are ideal; avoid live corals and sharp rocks as these can injure the seahorses.

Food and Diet: Our captive bred seahorses will thrive on frozen mysis shrimp. They need to be fed at least 2 to 3 times a day. Their diet may be supplemented by amphipods and copepods found in the live rock. Adding a refugium to the aquarium will increase this food source greatly. You may also feed vitamin-enriched adult brine shrimp, but this should be just as additional food. Brine shrimp have limited nutritional value.

Looking for the best food to feed your Seahorses?
We recommend AlgaGen Reefpods Tisbe

Reef Compatability: Yes

Level of Care: Moderate

Acclimation time: 2+ hours

Approximate Purchase Size: 2-1/2" to 3-1/2"








Male or Female $109.99



Barbouri Seahorse, Captive-Bred
Hippocampus barbouri
Picture of Captive-Bred Hippocampus barbouri Seahorse Video of Captive-Bred Hippocampus barbouri Seahorse
Description: The Hippocampus barbouri is an exceptional seahorse that is sure to enhance your aquarium. Its brilliant yellow color and zebra snout sets it apart from any other seahorse. Born a striking yellow with its textured skin with spines protruding from its body make it an unusual species. Like most seahorses, it likes to hang out in intertidal zones amongst seagrass beds and mangrove roots. This seahorse is indigenous to the indo-pacific and can be found along the coasts of Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. The majority of seahorses adapt to their surroundings and change color with their mood; however, the Barbour’s seahorse is naturally yellow and only changes shades between pale yellow and yellowish brown. Captive bred seahorses will have a higher life expectancy than wild caught ones. Wild caught seahorses most often come in malnourished and carry diseases while captive bred seahorses are already trained to eat frozen food. The prickly seahorse Hippocampus barbouri is equally well-adapted for a reef system with hard corals. In fact, H. barbouri is said to be impervious to the stings of stony corals. Barbs prefer warmer temperatures than most other seahorses and are the perfect choice for a reef tank that includes LPS and SPS corals.

The Barbouri seahorse feeds mainly on minute crustaceans and brine shrimp, which they suck in through their snout. They are able to suck their prey by creating a current of water leading directly into its snout. Since seahorses are weak swimmers, they must ambush their prey by blending into their surroundings, which they do rather easily. The Barbouri seahorse's eyes can move independently of one another, allowing it to effectively scan its surroundings. The species is sexually dimorphic and it is easy to distinguish between a male and female lined seahorse. The males are larger and also have longer tails. The erectus seahorse is monogamous and performs ritual dances every morning to re-establish the bond with its mate. In addition, they create clicking sounds while embracing their partner. This action occurs when they initially find their mate. The intensity of their bond is also conveyed in how they handle the death of their partner: If either the male or female should die, the mate does not automatically replace the deceased mate with a new one. Often, it fails to find a new mate in its short lifespan.


Tank Conditions The Barbouri Seahorse Seahorse should ideally be kept in temperatures between 72 and 78 degrees Fahrenheit. A pH value of 8.1 or 8.4, and a specific gravity of 1.020 to 1.025 should be maintained. When kept with invertebrates, the specific gravity range should be 1.020 to 1.025, for the invertebrate species. In a fish only aquarium, the specific gravity should fall between 1.020 and 1.023

Tank Recommendations These social swimmers thrive when kept either as a mated pair or as a group in a species only aquarium. For a pair a 30 gallon aquarium will do, for every two additional seahorses add 10 gallons to the minimum size. Seahorses may be kept with small, slow feeding fish such as smaller gobies, pipefish, dragonets, and firefish. Stay away from aggressive, territorial, and fast moving fish as they will not be good neighbors for the seahorse.

Food and Diet: Our captive bred seahorses will thrive on frozen mysis shrimp. They need to be fed at least 2 to 3 times a day. Their diet may be supplemented by amphipods and copepods found in the live rock. Adding a refugium to the aquarium will increase this food source greatly. You may also feed vitamin-enriched adult brine shrimp, but this should be just as additional food. Brine shrimp have limited nutritional value.

Looking for the best food to feed your Seahorses?
We recommend AlgaGen Reefpods Tisbe

Reef Compatability: Yes

Level of Care: Moderate

Acclimation time: 2+ hours

Approximate Purchase Size: 1-1/2" to 2-1/2"












Male or Female $219.99





Reidi Seahorse, Captive-Bred
Hippocampus Reidi
Picture of Reidi Seahorse, Captive-Bred
Youtube Video Hippocampus Reidi Seahorse Captive-Bred
Description: The ever-popular Brazilian seahorses Hippocampus reidi are sleek, graceful animals, perfectly proportioned with slender bodies, long tails, and long snouts. Their appearance gives rise to their other common names, the slender seahorse or the long-snout seahorse. Whereas the robust H. erectus is solidly built, like a truck, H. reidi shares the graceful curves of a Corvette stingray. The result is an elegant warm-water seahorse that is an all-time favorite.

Long renowned for their brilliant colors, rapid color changes, prolific breeding habits, and huge broods of difficult-to-raise fry, all serious seahorse keepers are familiar with these breathtaking beauties. Often proclaimed the most attractive of seahorses, H. reidi is the crown jewel in many aquarists’ collections. These rather majestic steeds are long-lived, and with good care they will be your companions for the next 8 to 10 years, and may eventually reach a length of 8 inches. The Brazilian Seahorse (Hippocampus reidi) was initially introduced into the aquarium trade after being imported from Brazil in the past, this is actually an Atlantic Ocean species that occurs from as far north as the Carolinas, Bermuda, and south to Brazil. They have a range of color variations from black to yellow, orange and red. These seahorses are Captive-Bred and are available in the Yellow or Black color variant. The coloration may change in the aquarium and is highly dependent on the colors of its environment.

When ready to mate, the male Reidi Seahorse will show off for the female with dramatic color changes, pouch displays, and lots of special seahorse dancing. If receptive, the female will wrap her tail, dance along with the male, and then deposit as many as 600 eggs in the male's pouch. About 14 days later, the male will give birth to between 50-400 perfect miniature reidi seahorses.


Tank Conditions The Reidi Seahorse Seahorse should ideally be kept in temperatures between 72 and 78 degrees Fahrenheit. A pH value of 8.1 or 8.4, and a specific gravity of 1.020 to 1.025 should be maintained. When kept with invertebrates, the specific gravity range should be 1.020 to 1.025, for the invertebrate species. In a fish only aquarium, the specific gravity should fall between 1.020 and 1.023

Tank Recommendations These social swimmers thrive when kept either as a mated pair or as a group in a species only aquarium. For a pair a 30 gallon aquarium will do, for every two additional seahorses add 10 gallons to the minimum size. Seahorses may be kept with small, slow feeding fish such as smaller gobies, pipefish, dragonets, and firefish. Stay away from aggressive, territorial, and fast moving fish as they will not be good neighbors for the seahorse.

Food and Diet: Our captive bred seahorses will thrive on frozen mysis shrimp. They need to be fed at least 2 to 3 times a day. Their diet may be supplemented by amphipods and copepods found in the live rock. Adding a refugium to the aquarium will increase this food source greatly. You may also feed vitamin-enriched adult brine shrimp, but this should be just as additional food. Brine shrimp have limited nutritional value.

Looking for the best food to feed your Seahorses?
We recommend AlgaGen Reefpods Tisbe

Reef Compatability: Yes

Level of Care: Moderate

Acclimation time: 2+ hours

Approximate Purchase Size: Medium 2" to 3" Large 3" to 4"

























Medium Male $149.99 Medium Female $149.99
Large Male $199.99 Large Female $199.99


























Tigertail Seahorse, Captive-Bred
Hippocampus comes
Picture of Tigertail Seahorse, Hippocampus comes
Video 1-1/2 Year Old Pair Hippocampus Comes Seahorse's
Description: Named for its black and yellow striped tail, the tiger tail seahorse (Hippocampus comes) will grow to between 6 and 8 inches. It is an unusual-looking fish, with an upright posture, curved trunk, and grasping, prehensile tail. The head, which is positioned at right angles to the body, bears a long, tubular snout, and the eyes are able to swivel independently. Unusually for a fish, seahorses lack scales, and the skin is stretched over a serious of bony plates which appear as obvious rings around the trunk and tail. The dorsal fin is used for locomotion, and two small, ear-like pectoral fins are used for steering. The Males of the species are often blackish, while females are usually yellowish. Both have a camouflage of stripes and blotches with dramatic markings around the eyes. Young seahorses cling to swaying sargassum and macroalgae beds. Timid adults hide in coral reefs during the day, coming out to feed at night. The male carries the eggs in a brood pouch located under the tail. The coloration may change in the aquarium and is highly dependent on the colors of its environment.

The mating ritual of the Tigertail Seahorse is quite fascinating. When the male is ready to mate, he will present the female with a dance, color changes, blatant pouch displays, and active gyrations. If the female is receptive, she will entwine tails with the male, dance, and promenade with it, and then insert as many as 500 to 600 eggs in the male pouch. About two weeks later, the male gives birth to between 50 and 400 miniature duplicates of the pair.

Tank Conditions The Tiger Tail Seahorse Seahorse should ideally be kept in temperatures between 72 and 78 degrees Fahrenheit. A pH value of 8.1 or 8.4, and a specific gravity of 1.020 to 1.025 should be maintained. When kept with invertebrates, the specific gravity range should be 1.020 to 1.025, for the invertebrate species. In a fish only aquarium, the specific gravity should fall between 1.020 and 1.023

Tank Recommendations These social swimmers thrive when kept either as a mated pair or as a group in a species only aquarium. For a pair a 30 gallon aquarium will do, for every two additional seahorses add 10 gallons to the minimum size. Seahorses may be kept with small, slow feeding fish such as smaller gobies, pipefish, dragonets, and firefish. Stay away from aggressive, territorial, and fast moving fish as they will not be good neighbors for the seahorse.

Food and Diet: Our captive bred seahorses will thrive on frozen mysis shrimp. They need to be fed at least 2 to 3 times a day. Their diet may be supplemented by amphipods and copepods found in the live rock. Adding a refugium to the aquarium will increase this food source greatly. You may also feed vitamin-enriched adult brine shrimp, but this should be just as additional food. Brine shrimp have limited nutritional value.

Looking for the best food to feed your Seahorses?
We recommend AlgaGen Reefpods Tisbe

Reef Compatability: Yes

Level of Care: Moderate

Acclimation time: 2+ hours

Approximate Purchase Size: 2" to 3"



























Unsexed $49.99 Female $59.99 Male $69.99

































Banded Pipefish
Doryrhamphus dactyliophorus
Picture of Banded Pipefish, Doryrhamphus dactyliophorus
Video of Banded Pipefish, Doryrhamphus dactyliophorus
Description: The banded pipefish is also known as Ringed Pipefish. Its body is very sleek resembling more like an eel. The Red Banded Pipefish is one of the highly prized reef pipefish or flagtail pipefish from the tropical Indo-Pacific. It is a relative of the seahorse with a very long, slender, cylindrical body that resembles a colorful pipe cleaner (hence the name pipefish). This species is boldly marked, with dark reddish to maroon vertical rings running the length of its body and a very striking flag-like tail that is used to propel it horizontally through the water. The tail is a bright red oval with a brilliant white margin all around and a distinctive yellow mark in the center that is often shaped like a cube or rectangle rather than a round dot. This brilliant tail fin makes the Red Banded Pipefish a faster, stronger swimmer than its seahorse cousins and it rarely comes in direct contact with the substrate. Unlike the slowpoke seahorse, which moves through the water vertically (head up and tail down) with a stately, dignified swimming style, the Red Banded Pipefish propels itself horizontally through the water like a torpedo with powerful strokes of its oar-like tail and sinuous body when swimming. This fish is of peaceful nature. They pose no danger to other fishes. However, they are prone to attacks by aggressive fishes such as wrasses, tobies, triggerfish, porcupine fish etc. This species can grow up to 8 inches in length. Banded pipefish are live bearers that form mated pairs; they are pouch breeders (females attach their eggs to the brood patch on the underside of their mates and the males then carry the eggs and developing young until birth).

Tank Conditions The Doryrhamphus dactyliophorus should ideally be kept in temperatures between 72 and 78 degrees Fahrenheit. The Ph balance of the water should also be maintained between 8.1 and 8.4 as they prefer alkaline content of the water to be high. The specific gravity should be maintained ideally between 1.020-1.025. Strive to provide them with multiple cave-like structures or overhangs in a well-planted aquarium with lots of colorful macroalgae that simulates their natural habitat and provides shelter for abundant population of copepods and amphipods.

Tank Recommendations A well-planted "Fish-Only-with-Live-Rock" (FOWLR) seahorse setup or seahorse-safe reef tank is the ideal habitat for the Red Banded Pipefish. Plenty of live rock, lots of macroalgae, colorful artificial corals, or seahorse-safe soft corals are all very appropriate forms of decor. In the wild, these pipefish can be found swimming under rocky overhangs, corals, or close to the floor of its reef habitat, and in the aquarium they will appreciate live rock arrangements that form caves, arches, and overhanging ledges. (Pipefish will often swim upside down along the roof of a cave or overhang.) In a tank with lots of live rock and a thriving pod population, you may sometimes see the red banded pipefish slithering along the bottom of the tank in a very serpentine fashion, as it hunts for copepods and amphipods and all the nooks and crannies in the rockwork. Tankmates must be quite peaceful, as pipefish make good targets for fin-nipping species. FYI: This is a slow moving fish that can easily get sucked into an open intake siphon; therefore these type intakes must have a strainer on their intake areas.

Food and Diet: The Red Banded Pipefish is a carnivore that needs a meaty diet but it's tiny, tubular mouth severely limits the size of the prey items it can consume. In the wild, its diet consists primarily of copepods and in the aquarium it will thrive in a well-established tank with lots of live rock and macroalgae that houses a large pod population. Hobbyists will find it convenient to supplement its diet with Algagen Tisbe, Bottled Live Copepods, which are an ideal food for this fastidious feeder. Over time, as it becomes accustomed to its new surroundings, the Red Banded Pipefish will be content eating non-living foods such as frozen CYCLOP-EEZE®, very small frozen Mysis, and Nutramar Ova.

When it comes to frozen food, stick with the smallest brands of frozen Mysis (e.g., Mini Mysis by H2O Life) and bars of frozen Cyclop-Eeze for best results. Bars of frozen Cyclop-Eze work especially well because they will shed copious amounts of the bite-size frozen cyclops. Brands of larger frozen Mysis can also be used for feeding the pipefish, and hobbyists tell me that their red banded pipes can even handle the jumbo Piscine Energetics frozen Mysis relicta, looking a bit like a sword swallower in the process, as they gradually gulp down the king sized Mysis shrimp in several bites. But the brands of bigger frozen Mysis often work better after they have been minced or shaved. The frozen Mysis that works best for most hobbyists when minced is Hikari in frozen blocks rather than trays. The Hikari Mysis is much smaller than Piscine Energetics Mysis relicta and that makes it easier to shave off bite-sized pieces for the pipefish. When it comes to shaving the Mysis, a technique that works well for many home hobbyists is to use a potato peeler to shave off bits of the Hikari Mysis from a frozen block, and then use a single edged razor blade to further mince the frozen bits the potato peeler has removed. Small, frequent feedings are best. Try to feed your pipefish at least three times daily and be careful not to overfeed at any single feeding, especially with the frozen Cyclop-eeze, which tends to be messy because significant amounts of it go uneaten.


Looking for the best food to feed your Pipefish?
We recommend AlgaGen Reefpods Tisbe

Reef Compatability: Yes

Level of Care: Moderate

Acclimation time: 2+ hours

Approximate Purchase Size: 3" to 5"

$29.99



Bluestripe Pipefish, Captive Bred
Doryrhamphus excisus
Picture of Bluestripe Pipefish, Doryrhamphus excisus

Description: Cultured Bluestripe pipefish are raised on prepared, often frozen meaty foods, eliminating the old requirement of offering live foods for successful husbandry. Bluestripes are one of the hardiest pipefish, and choosing aquacultured specimens increases your chance of success even more. They are also called blue-and-orange cleaner pipefish. Bluestripe Pipefish are beautiful and very delicate fish, which can make a great addition to peaceful aquariums. Bluestripe Pipefish have a long slender orange body with a thick horizontal blue stripe going along the length of their body. They will grow to a length of up to 8 inches. In aquariums, pipefish make excellent tankmates for seahorses, dragonets, and other peaceful, slow-moving species. Their unique appearance and useful predatory habits, combined with a vibrant blue and orange coloration, have made them a popular aquarium species, especially for seahorse and low-nutrient SPS aquariums. In the wild, Bluestripe Pipefish inhabit rocky crevices in lagoons and reefs of depths from 2 to 45 meters all throughout the waters of the Indo-Pacific and Eastern Pacific. They feed primarily on planktonic organisms and small crustaceans. Much like seahorses, Bluestripe Pipefish are ovoviviparous, meaning the males carry the eggs in a brood pouch, which is found under their tail.

Bluestripe Pipefish are extremely delicate fish that cannot be housed with any sort of aggressive fish. Seahorses and other Pipefish are generally good tank mates. Bluestripe Pipefish also like tanks with light to moderate flow. Stinging coral and anemones can be dangerous to Bluestripe Pipefish, and should be avoided.


Tank Conditions The Bluestripe Pipefish should ideally be kept in temperatures between 72 and 78 degrees Fahrenheit. The Ph balance of the water should also be maintained between 8.1 and 8.4 as they prefer alkaline content of the water to be high. The specific gravity should be maintained ideally between 1.020-1.025. Strive to provide them with multiple cave-like structures or overhangs in a well-planted aquarium with lots of colorful macroalgae that simulates their natural habitat and provides shelter for abundant population of copepods and amphipods.

Tank Recommendations A well-planted "Fish-Only-with-Live-Rock" (FOWLR) seahorse setup or seahorse-safe reef tank is the ideal habitat for the Bluestripe Pipefish. Plenty of live rock, lots of macroalgae, colorful artificial corals, or seahorse-safe soft corals are all very appropriate forms of decor. In the wild, these pipefish can be found swimming under rocky overhangs, corals, or close to the floor of its reef habitat, and in the aquarium they will appreciate live rock arrangements that form caves, arches, and overhanging ledges. (Pipefish will often swim upside down along the roof of a cave or overhang.) In a tank with lots of live rock and a thriving pod population, you may sometimes see the red banded pipefish slithering along the bottom of the tank in a very serpentine fashion, as it hunts for copepods and amphipods and all the nooks and crannies in the rockwork. Tankmates must be quite peaceful, as pipefish make good targets for fin-nipping species. FYI: This is a slow moving fish that can easily get sucked into an open intake siphon; therefore these type intakes must have a strainer on their intake areas.

Food and Diet: The Bluestripe Pipefish is a carnivore that needs a meaty diet but it's tiny, tubular mouth severely limits the size of the prey items it can consume. In the wild, its diet consists primarily of copepods and in the aquarium it will thrive in a well-established tank with lots of live rock and macroalgae that houses a large pod population. Hobbyists will find it convenient to supplement its diet with Algagen Tisbe, Bottled Live Copepods, which are an ideal food for this fastidious feeder. Over time, as it becomes accustomed to its new surroundings, the Red Banded Pipefish will be content eating non-living foods such as frozen CYCLOP-EEZE®, very small frozen Mysis, and Nutramar Ova.

When it comes to frozen food, stick with the smallest brands of frozen Mysis (e.g., Mini Mysis by H2O Life) and bars of frozen Cyclop-Eeze for best results. Bars of frozen Cyclop-Eze work especially well because they will shed copious amounts of the bite-size frozen cyclops. Brands of larger frozen Mysis can also be used for feeding the pipefish, and hobbyists tell me that their red banded pipes can even handle the jumbo Piscine Energetics frozen Mysis relicta, looking a bit like a sword swallower in the process, as they gradually gulp down the king sized Mysis shrimp in several bites. But the brands of bigger frozen Mysis often work better after they have been minced or shaved. The frozen Mysis that works best for most hobbyists when minced is Hikari in frozen blocks rather than trays. The Hikari Mysis is much smaller than Piscine Energetics Mysis relicta and that makes it easier to shave off bite-sized pieces for the pipefish. When it comes to shaving the Mysis, a technique that works well for many home hobbyists is to use a potato peeler to shave off bits of the Hikari Mysis from a frozen block, and then use a single edged razor blade to further mince the frozen bits the potato peeler has removed. Small, frequent feedings are best. Try to feed your pipefish at least three times daily and be careful not to overfeed at any single feeding, especially with the frozen Cyclop-eeze, which tends to be messy because significant amounts of it go uneaten.


Looking for the best food to feed your Pipefish?
We recommend AlgaGen Reefpods Tisbe

Reef Compatability: Yes

Level of Care: Moderate

Acclimation time: 2+ hours

Approximate Purchase Size: 2" to 4"

Single$49.99 Mated Pair$129.99



ReefPods Tisbe by AlgaGen
Picture of ReefPods Tisbe by AlgaGen
ReefPods Tisbe the most popular aquarium Pod -they consumes your aquarium's wastes and detritus, reproduce well, and are food for your Seahorses and Pipefish!

ReefPods Tisbe is a live culture
of the harpacticoid copepod Tisbe biminiensis. Tisbe adult copepods live on bottom substrate such as live rock or sand and will eat detritus and microalage in the aquarium. They produce a small nauplii which is an excellent food for aquarium filter feeders and fish larvae. The adults are eaten by small bottom feeding fish such as seahorses, pipefish, dragonettes and blennies. ReefPods Tisbe may be used as a starter cultureto add to marine aquarium refugiums or the main tank. Once established they will reproduce quickly, growing from nauplii to adults in about nine days. They will thrive in a wide range of aquarium temperatures and a wide range of salinities. It is suggested they be added to the aquarium at night or to the refugium to avoid immediate fish predation.


An excellent all-purpose aquarium copepod
owing to its role in the natural environment as a detritivore. An opportunist feeder, Tisbe can be used as a tank cleaner consuming uneaten food and wastes as well as phytoplankton in the tank and refugium. Tisbe is capable of producing many eggs during its adult life span that hatch into nauplii which will enter the water column as food for your filter feeding reef inhabitants and replenish the adult population vital to tank hygiene. Tisbe adults and juveniles may also enter the water column and be tasty and nutritious treats for your reef fish! ReefPods are guaranteed to arrive alive but there is no further guarantee after arrival.


Copepods "Pods" in aquarium terms are a major component of the modern reef aquarium.
Although, pods often are accidently introduced via live rock placed in reef aquariums, until recently there were few options available to control and maintain copepod populations. If lucky, aquarists would see swarms of these little white "bugs" on the glass of their aquarium and subsequent feeding on these bugs by the fish. Now, these beneficial bugs are recognized as copepods and the methods for their colonization and proliferation in aquariums is better understood.The addition and establishment of copepod cultures to reef tanks is one of the best ways to achieve a continuous self-generating food supply. Aquarists who have established copepod populations know that most coral and many other filter feeding invertebrates and small bottom feeding fish such as Mandarins greatly benefit from copepods.

All of the AlgaGen ReefPods are tropical herbivorous species of copepods that will survive in higher temperature tanks.
Copepods are an important energy source for reefs. Aquarists try to supply that energy using frozen or preserved diets. Dead plankton is not as nutritious as live plankton and food particles that are not eaten foul water quality and add to nutrient levels. Non-living food items do not swim about naturally and trigger feeding responses. Professional and hobby aquarists, alike, now have the ability to inoculate their systems with different copepod species at will. They can experiment with different types and combinations of pods for different types of feeders. Mandarins and Seahorses, Anthias and Dragonettes, LPS Corals, deep water gorgonians, Acropora, Crinoids, Basket Stars: the list of copepod lovers could go on and on.


Approximate copepod count:
8 oz bottles contain 100 to 200 pods
16 oz bottles contain 200 to 300 pods.





ReefPods Tisbe 8 ounce $14.99
ReefPods Tisbe 16 ounce $29.98



Copyright 2018 Aquarium Creations Online
Photos are representative of each species. All marine life will be unique and variations should be expected, color and sizes may vary. *Guarantee Restriction: All of our livestock are guaranteed. However for one or more of these species, they may be marked with a guarantee restriction. If it does, it means the specific animal may not handle stress from environmental conditions well. These stresses can include poor water quality, harassment from tank mates or confined aquarium conditions. When stressed, these species can lose the ability to ward off infection and disease. Other species may be listed as Restricted because they have such specialized feeding requirements that is difficult recreate in a aquarium and may succumb to malnutrition.